.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Four dead in wake of Hurricane Michael

-A A +A

Virtually entire county without power

A curfew stayed in effect Thursday as nighttime plunged Gadsden County into darkness, the result of a Category 4 Hurricane Michael that rumbled through the Panhandle on Wednesday.

Virtually the entire county was without power as public works employees sought to clear roads from fallen trees, downed power lines and debris.

About 1,100 residents sought relief at one of three shelters that opened. Others braved the storm at home, and deputies were sent into neighborhood conducting wellness checks for worried friends and relatives, Gadsden County spokeswoman Olivia Smith said.

The phone number to call to ask the Gadsden Sheriff’s Office to make a welfare check is 850-875-8833.

Asked how many people in Gadsden were without power, sheriff’s Major Shawn Wood said: “Everybody.”

The sheriff’s office reported four hurricane-related deaths. One man was killed by a fallen tree on Wednesday, and details of the other deaths were unavailable pending next of kin, the sheriff’s office said on its Facebook page.

Officials were urging residents to stay put. By early evening, the county work crews had been able to clear many of the major roads.

Once the curfew is lifted, the county will issue a list of closed roads, Smith said.

The county was working with state government to bring water and ice to the community sometime Friday.

“We’ll try to feed thousands of people tomorrow,” Wood said Thursday night. “Gov. (Rick) Scott has been very good to us. They’ve got supplies coming in, help coming in.”

An alert went out Thursday night calling for volunteers to help at water distribution sites. To help, call 850-875-0153 or 850-627-0899. Volunteers will be needed at 8:30 a.m. Friday.

The Rev. Charles Morris, pastor of the New Bethel AME Church in Quincy, said workers did a great job Thursday opening up roads and clearing debris.

“The response has been great,” he said. “There were trees all over the place blocking traffic. They cleared the trees so that there’s reasonable passage.”

Nearly all the damage was wind-related.

“If trees didn’t fall on the homes, they’ll be in good shape,” Morris said. “It’ll just be a matter of cleaning them up.”

Wood said he viewed parts of the county on Thursday.

“It’s like every other major disaster we’ve had,” he said. “It’s like Katrina. It’s pretty bad.”A curfew stayed in effect Thursday as nighttime plunged Gadsden County into darkness, the result of a Category 4 Hurricane Michael that rumbled through the Panhandle on Wednesday. The mandatory curfew is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. This restriction does not apply to any law enforcement officers, military personnel assigned for hurricane disaster duties, emergency medical personnel, or any other individual or groups of individuals whose job/employment will assist with the public’s health, safety, or welfare (i.e. fuel delivery personnel, utility repair personnel, etc.)

Virtually the entire county was without power as public works employees sought to clear roads from fallen trees, downed power lines and debris.

About 1,100 residents sought relief at one of three shelters that opened. Others braved the storm at home, and deputies were sent into neighborhood conducting wellness checks for worried friends and relatives, Gadsden County spokeswoman Olivia Smith said.

Officials were urging residents to stay put. By early evening, the county work crews had been able to clear many of the major roads.

Once the curfew is lifted, the county will issue a list of closed roads, Smith said.

The county was working with the state government to bring water and ice to the community sometime Friday.

An alert went out Thursday night calling for volunteers to help at water distribution sites. To help, call 850-875-0153 or 850-627-0899. Volunteers will be needed at 8:30 a.m. Friday.

The Rev. Charles Morris, pastor of the New Bethel AME Church in Quincy, said workers did a great job Thursday opening up roads and clearing debris.

Nearly all the damage was wind-related.