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Opinion

  • During the few years that I have lived in Gadsden County, I have definitely had my share of ups and mostly downs when it comes to working with teachers and administrative staff in our school system. But this school term, I am proud to say that Gadsden County has finally produced a principal that truly cares about our children. His name is William R. Blitch.

  • President Obama says: "No federal dollars (in his health care proposal) will be used to fund abortions." That is untrue. Obama's proposal explicitly allows payment for all elective abortions under his "public option." Any person enrolled in that plan would be required to pay an additional premium (an abortion "surcharge") to cover the cost. Abortionists would send bills for abortions to the federal government and receive payment checks drawn on a federal Treasury account.  The funds in this account are government (i.e. public) funds.

  • Is the bully law being enforced in the public schools of Gadsden County? In my opinion as a parent, no!

    My son, a sixth grader in the county school district, has not felt safe in the schools he has attended. As a fourth grader at Stewart Street Elementary, he was bullied on a daily basis by some male students in the same  grade. According to my son, there were no teachers supervising the halls when he was called names, pushed and threatened.

  • On the evening of  Sept. 23, I needed medical care. I went to the Gadsden County Urgent Care. I was taken care of by a competent, courteous staff. I was treated and back home within  an hour, including travel time.

    We need a facility like this more than a hospital. The community would be wise to support this needed care center.

    Fred Miller

    Quincy

     

  • The No. 1 preventable cause of death in America is tobacco use.  On Sept. 22, an effort by the United States Food and Drug Administration was made to protect America’s young.  A ban on candy and fruit flavored cigarettes was authorized by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.  

    According to the act, it is against the law for any cigarette sold in the United States to have a flavor consisting of natural, artificial, herb or spice.  

  • Administrative law judge Lisa Nelson recently ruled that I, as former principal of Carter-Parramore Academy, was justified in using pepper spray during two altercations at the school in 2007. The Florida Department of Education had sought to revoke my certification as an educator.

    However, after an evidentiary hearing, the judged ruled that I did what any reasonable person should have done to protect himself, his staff and students from two dangerous situations. Nelson confirmed that I had violated no laws and was not guilty of violating any of the rules of the FDOE.

  • In my opinion, there is no legitimate reason for county EMS director Brian Beasley to suffer suspension for doing an excellent job. Almost every week, Brian is on TV bringing in  grants to Gadsden County. Unlike the US Army, whose mission is to kill, Beasley's job is to save lives.

    If an ambulance reaches a citizen's residence late, it's not Beasley's fault.

    Beasley does not need to be home, but rather on the job so that he can continue to be instrumental in saving lives.

    Bobby Jamison

    Gadsden County

  • I worked with the Gadsden County hospital when it was moved from what is now the Gadsden County Sheriff's Offices. In the 2 years I worked with the hospital, my hours were cut twice from 40 hours per week to 20 hours a week. This was in the mid-1980s. The hospital didn't make enough money then and hasn't since that time.

    On April 26, 2007, I had an occasion whereby I had to use the services of the Urgent Care. I have Medicare and a supplement insurance that pays what Medicare doesn't.

  • Gadsden County has many polite and helpful people.  I have had the opportunity to meet many during the past two weeks while campaigning for the District 7 (Wakulla) position on the board of the Talquin Electric Cooperative.  People have listened carefully to my explanation of the petition process by which my name appears on the ballot, have asked thoughtful questions and have expressed some concerns.  Mostly they have really been gracious to a stranger.

  • With many schools in the Gadsden County school district in need of volunteers and supplies, several organization are lending a helping hand to the teachers and students of St. John Elementary.

  • I read your article by Chris McGoey on the tear gas explanation in the Sept 3 issue. I would like to comment on personal safety.

  • Due to the constraints of time, I have been unable to attend Rep. Allen Boyd's town hall meetings, so I choose this public forum.

    I commend you for your service to our country. That was then...this is now.

    You were one of 219 congressmen to vote for that deplorable tax and trade bill. Now you are going around the district explaining yourself away about the Obama health care bill. Congressman, this is a no-brainer. Vote no!

  • I am writing to encourage readers to support efforts to offer health insurance for all Americans.  I want to bypass arguments that have been made by experts on both sides.

    This is a guts and glory appeal.

    We need to address the health insurance issue the American way: Determine that we will do the right thing. With right on our side, figure out how to overcome the obstacles. Make it work right, rather than whimper about some imaginary doomsday.  

  • Once deadened, the conscience is difficult to restore.  "Pro-choice" President Barack Obama is seeking to further deaden the conscience of the American public regarding abortion on-demand. 

    As recorded in his July 17, 2007 campaign stump with Planned Parenthood, his stated desire is to force all taxpayers,  regardless of their personal moral/religious views, to fund abortion in his health care reform proposals.

  • I have been reluctant to write this to the people of Quincy but I felt I needed to do so.

    I was a resident of Gadsden County all my life and 5 years ago I had to move to Tallahassee.

    My wife and I still go over to Mt. Pleasant every Sunday to church. We take the interstate and exit at the Quincy exit and turn down Martin Luther Boulevard to Atlanta street.

    Martin Luther King Boulevard is a place to be ashamed of. Pretty soon the pavement will be completely gone.

  • I realize that many cities use their utilities as cash cows, but 290 percent is ridiculous. In the past 50 years,  the rate has risen from 50 percent of the water bill to almost 300 percent at present. How much higher will the rate rise if it is not challenged? Water cannot be a problem because the city is on the banks of the Appalachicola River.

    This should be an issue in the next city election.

  • What kind of jerk would bash teachers?  I was the only secretary in an elementary school for 6 years and I can truthfully say the teachers made my day.  And what would I have done had it not been for the wonderful teachers I had through my 14 years of school? 

  • The sudden death of legendary pop star Michael Jackson is a reminder that no matter how iconic you are you are mortal too.

    His shocking death is no question, in my opinion, much larger than Elvis Presley's in 1977. People of all walks of life broke down in tears.

    Michael never really had the formal education he needed because his father pushed him hard growing up in show business. He was a child prodigy with a sweet singing voice, and by the time he was older, his talent was the best, bar none. He became the King of Pop and filled arenas around the world.

  • On behalf of America’s Second Harvest of the Big Bend, we want to thank the citizens of Gadsden County for your generous support of the 2009 Stamp Out Hunger food drive held May 9. We also want to thank the Quincy post office and the many letter carriers for all of your work in collecting the food.

  • I would like to add to the accolades of Rev. Jake Till, who died recently after a very fruitful life.

    Several very good writers left out this very important ministry of Till's, and I would like to add it to the record.

    Till served for at least 25 years as chaplain to the Florida State Prison in Quincy. He preached to, counseled and baptized incarcerated young men; I would estimate around 2,500. I am tempted to wager that very few of these men never came back to prison but were instead released to a glorious adventure that Till described to them every Sunday.