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Opinion

  • When is the last time you’ve been read to?
    Was it a pleasant, soothing experience?
    Some of us are fortunate enough to remember our mothers or dads reading to us, especially at that greatest time of all, just before going off to sleep.
    At our house we had a set of books called the Junior Classics.
    Each of my brothers and sister had a favorite story my mother would read.

  • I bet she would be a little upset with herself if she knew that ever since she made the comment, way back in May: “Those glasses are awful; they don’t do a thing for you,” that I’ve been going crazy switching them back and forth with another pair she found acceptable.
    I don’t even see well with the pair she favors.
    Oh well ...
    Yes, faithful readers, I do remember I recently wrote about eye glasses.
    Claire Roxann Willis Collier is my only sister, and she’s
    precious.

  • Is pizza your favorite food as it is with so many Americans?
    It’s been mine ever since Butch Santy’s mother served me some of her own, homemade style, back in the early ‘50s.
    Of course, Mrs. Santy was Italian, and she probably grew up making pizza as so many Italian women did in those days.
    It’s a good thing my father was as crazy about pizza as his kids were or we’d have suffered big time.
    In my section of central Connecticut there were pizza o,r Italian restaurants on just about every street corner it seemed.

  • “Ray, one day you’ll be ready for sitting atop a stool and singing and playing at Chuck’s Steak House on a Friday night,” remarked my first guitar teacher, George
    Raccio.
    I’ve never known how to take that statement of George’s, especially after having been his student for a couple of years.
    On one hand, it could have been encouraging. Chuck’s was one of a chain of Connecticut steak houses very popular at the time.

  • Here in Aiken, S.C., I can tell the season is about to change, and that fall is in the air.
    The leaves are beginning to exhibit those majestic reddish colors, and some are even dropping to the ground.
    My wife has been reminding me often that she can detect the change of the season.
    For her that has been quite easy lately as she hasn’t been getting around much and seems to be more tuned in to subtle changes around her.

  • Gloria Dowaliby should haven been in show business. Instead, she chose the teaching profession. She was glamorous, witty and just seemed to have all those characteristics of a Broadway star. Fortunately for Gloria’s students, she became a teacher.
    Gloria started her teaching career around 1953 at Lincoln-
    Lewis Junior High in Southington, Conn.
    I was privileged to have had Miss Dowaliby as my seventh-grade English, history and homeroom teacher.

  • The other day I thought of the phrase, “the best worst thing.”
    Is it even possible to have a best worst thing? Isn’t that an oxymoron, like jumbo shrimp or pretty ugly?
    For one of my daughters, the past year has been the worst of her life, and she’s still asking why. “If Jesus loves me, why did he let this happen?” she asks.

  • “What I really get a kick out of is that they call their high school mascot, the ‘Syrupers,’ or something like that. Doggonest thing,” my neighbor, Stan, laughingly shared with me.
    Stan and his smallish dog, Reggie, were heading up the street we both live on, Fantasy Way. My Yorkie, Nick, and I were headed toward them.
    It was early afternoon; we paused to converse.
    This gentle, elderly man’s habit, whenever encountering me, was to say something short and sweet. He always wore a smile and made me feel good.

  • Watching the movie “42” a few nights ago was good for my soul and reminded me of how much we need more movies or TV shows that inspire us with heroic deeds performed by true and deserving heroes.
    Most baseball fans, no matter how old, will recognize 42 as Jackie Robinson’s number when he played with the major league Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team.
    It is the only number that has been permanently retired by all major league baseball teams.

  • In the wake of the horrific murderous attacks in Paris, and in recognition that terrorism in all its forms must be condemned, it’s important to honor leaders who use non-violent means to reach needed
    societal reforms.
     In anticipation of the Monday, Jan. 19, Martin Luther King Day celebration, I’m pleased to share this personal reflection.  

  • By Nancy Kennedy

    Special to the Times

  •  Traditionally a day when we honor our mothers — in person, by phone, with a card or flowers, over a meal, or, as for me, in memory — Mother’s Day also provides us an opportunity for reflection. 

  •  Traditionally a day when we honor our mothers — in person, by phone, with a card or flowers, over a meal, or, as for me, in memory — Mother’s Day also provides us an opportunity for reflection. 

  • Progress on the Quincy Bypass, which will connect State Road 12 to U.S. Highway 90 near Ralph Strong Road and the Capital Regional Medical Center Gadsden Campus, is about 30 percent complete and work on the project is moving at a steady pace, according to Anthony Manos, project engineer.

     

    “Much of the clearing is done about a third of the drainage is complete and about 30 percent of the earthwork has been done,” Manos said.

     

  • We're proud of our Owls

    If they were a sports team there would be a parade, no doubt about it.

    When some entity from a small rural county in the Panhandle, ends up fifth in the entire state of Florida in anything positive, it is big news.

    And even more so when you consider we are talking about high-achieving children in a small local public school.

  • As the Great Recession continues with no leadership from Washington D.C. and a state government that seems bent on punishing its own residents, economic growth for Gadsden County will only happen through local leadership, commitment and perseverance.

    The pursuit of economic development and growth in this current climate is not for the meek or anyone easily discouraged. It will also require an energetic unity, goods lines of communications and wearing one's community pride like a badge.

  • Soon, members of the class of 2011 will step into the world amid optimistic speeches and witty greeting cards. Some will step seamlessly into their next phase in life, be it continuing education or gaining employment. For many, however, the state of the economy and corresponding high unemployment rate will stand as a barrier in efforts to engage society.
    It’s critical those clutching their new diplomas understand that, by graduating, they have proven something to their family, friends and the world: They are achievers.

  • Linger Longer

    AT YOUR LIBRARY

    Dr. Carolyn E. Poole, Director


    Congrats, Chattahoochee, there’s a triple treat in store for you. Three special authors are coming to town next week.

  • March 10, 2011


    To: America

    From: Dick (Cowboy) Locke


    Reference: Florida State Hospital, Chattahoochee, Florida


  •    I put off my spring flower planting. It wasn't easy either.
        I didn't make the same mistake this year as I did last year. I didn't let the weather fool me with the few warm days we have experienced in the past weeks. Not that I wasn't tempted to go to garden shops and bring home a truck filled with tender flowers just waiting for me to put in the ground. Just like babies, they look so cute when they're little.