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Features

  • If you’ve never been to a fair or fall festival in autumn you have missed one of life’s greatest treasures.  The weather usually becomes cooler and crisper.  The leaves on the trees are exhibiting their wondrous shades of yellow, orange and red.

  • The Gadsden County School District kicked off this year’s district mentoring initiative at Carter-Parramore Academy Oct 21 with a special program and lunch. This year there are 22 mentors teamed up with 23 students; one mentor is working with two students.

    Chad Price, a senior at CPA who is mentored by schools Superintendent Reginald James, welcomed everyone to the event and introduced his mentor. James gave a brief overview of the program, and CPA Principal Joe Lewis introduced the mentors and their students.

  • Jerome Maples is on point – just ask anyone who knows him.

  • "It's been a pleasure to serve you and to be a part of this wonderful organization," said immediate past president of the Quincy Kiwanis Club Charles Brinkley as his third non-consecutive term as president came to an end. Brinkley addressed his fellow club members and guests at the installation of the new officers Oct. 8.

    Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to changing the world one child, one community at a time. The motto is "One Can Make A Difference."

  • It was a bitter, cold Saturday morning.  The harsh November winds sweeping in from the Atlantic made Cape May, N.J. an undesirable place to be living.

  • If Carolyn Poole, the county's new director of libraries, was looking for a challenge, she found it. Undaunted however, Poole said her aim is to move the county forward.

    "This is a hard economic time. My budget was cut 30 percent and there is no money in the county's budget to buy new books," said the former Hillsborough County librarian.

    On the bright side, Poole is anticipating the delivery of a new $200,000 bookmobile that will be equipped with a pull-out canopy for displays, computers and wireless access.

  • “Oh, what a beautiful morning, oh what a beautiful day….”  Here I go again, singing to myself early in the morning before daybreak.  I just can’t help myself.  It’s a cool, almost crisp, morning.  The stars are shining brightly above.  I’m a lucky man and so glad to be alive.  I only wish more of you didn’t have to rush off to work or to school and that you were able to take life a little bit easier.

  • “Surely the presence of the Lord is in this place” has never been more true for me than it has the past few weeks. Those words also make up most of the byline of Along Twin Ponds Road, “Surely the Presence of the Lord Is in This ’Space’.”  It was Lanny Wolfe who wrote that wonderful song and who also made a beautiful recording of it with his Lanny Wolfe Trio.

    What seems to keep me going lately is the constant realization that the Lord’s presence is indeed with me, no matter where I am or what I’m doing.

  • Anyone who watched NFL football Sunday had to notice that all of the players and coaches were wearing something pink. From caps to shoes and gloves, professional football players were showing their support for breast cancer awareness and survivors.

    Sallie Farmer of Quincy didn't watch any football last weekend but she is grateful for the support. Farmer is a 5-year breast cancer survivor and credits much of her recovery to the advances in research and the educational  programs by the American Cancer Society.

  • Karema Daniels and Antonio Dudley are pleased to announce their engagement and forthcoming wedding.

    The bride-elect is the daughter of Ralph and Glynis Graham and the late Duane Michael Daniels. She is a graduate of Florida A&M University with a bachelor's degree in health care management, and is currently pursuing her master's in health service administration. She is employed with FAMU as a graduate assistant and with Gadsden County ARC as a resident assistant.

  • They joke that they are the best paid group of people in Gadsden County  because they work for free. What they lack in money is made up by the  satisfaction they derive from helping others. The volunteers of Mother Care Network Inc. were honored Sept. 28 with a dinner and praise for what they have given to the community.

  • When is the last time you “sold yourself short?”  If you’re not familiar with that particular phrase, when is the last time you may have talked yourself out of doing something, because for one reason or another, you didn’t think you were up to the task at hand? 

  • When Georgeann Reffner and her husband, Rich, moved to Gadsden County a few years ago, she was sure of two things: she knew she would love small town living, and she wanted to give back.

    She soon began working at the Gadsden Community Hospital, where she put her many years of nursing experience to work. She was troubled by the great need she saw for medical supplies, both in the hospital and in the community.

    Reffner was working at the hospital when it closed in 2005, and she began once again to ask herself what she could do to give back to the community.

  • Why can’t we as Americans act a little more like we belong to a nation called the “United States?”  What has happened to that attitude of good will toward our fellow man and the general “feel good all over” feeling that so many of us have felt in the past?  Or are you too young to remember those days?  If you haven’t had any reason to feel good about America for legitimate reasons, I am sorry about your plight.

  • “I must be nuts to be taking this walk in the dark again.  You know there are wild critters in these parts.  What if they’re hungry or  rabid?  Fool, you really should pack your rod, or at least take your walking stick.  Then you’d have a fighting chance if you were attacked.”

    On a few days of late these have been among my thoughts while walking along my usual Twin Ponds route.  There are street lights along the way, but that wouldn’t stop a bear or Florida wildcat from attacking me.

  • Shannon Renod Peoples and Verand Ke'shia Houston were married in a private ceremony July 11, 2009 at Tom Brown Park.

  • In recognition of a lifetime of dedication and support of the visual arts, Zoe Golloway, arts activist, founder and former director of Gadsden Art Center, will be honored at the LeMoyne Art & Soul Celebration Sept. 24 at the University Center Club.

  • Millie Forehand has always wanted to make a difference. Sometimes people liked it and sometimes they didn't but that never stopped her from trying. In 1995, she was unhappy with the way things were going in her neighborhood in the city of Quincy and she set out to make a difference by running for office. In 1997, she was elected mayor and served 1 year. The following year she was defeated.

     

  • Another summer is winding down, and I still haven’t gone fishing.  How I long to be sitting in a rowboat on some quiet lake at dusk with my spinning gear and old Jitterbug.  To listen to the “glub,” “glub," “glub” of that surface lure waiting for a largemouth bass to break the otherwise stillness of the lake when he charged it.

    It was the morning after Bobby Kennedy’s assassination when my brother Ken and I went fishing for the last time.  We fished at Lake Mashapaug in northeastern Connecticut that morning.

  • I was doing my early morning XM radio channel surfing when my ears caught a bouncy and light tune that also seem vaguely familiar.  I turned around to view the window on my radio which revealed I was listening to an Aaron Copland piece.  It was called "Duo for Flute and Piano."