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Features

  • “Pump Boys and Dinettes,” which opens Friday, Aug. 10 at The Quincy Music Theatre, is part theatre and part concert – and 100 percent top entertainment.  Six actors accompany themselves on stage, using songs to weave together the story of four gas station workers and two waitresses at the fictional Double Cupp Diner, located somewhere between Frog Level and Smyrna, North Carolina.

  • Quincy Music Theatre brings the updated 2001 version of “Godspell” to area audiences as its last production of this season. Modernized, vibrant and enchanting, the show has a rock opera score based on the gospels of Matthew and Luke. It opens this Friday evening for two weekends, April 20-22 and April 27-29.

  • Wind Creek Casino & Hotel in Atmore, Ala. will be welcoming Brian McKnight to the stage. McKnight will be performing on Saturday, April 30 at 9 pm in the Amphitheater at Wind Creek. Tickets are on sale now at Essentials Gift Shoppe in the Wind Creek Casino & Hotel or tickets are available online at Ticketmaster.com and at all Ticketmaster Outlets. Tickets are priced from $20 - $60.

  • RANAE S. ARNETTE
    Times Correspondent

     In the Food & Sciences Department at The Florida State University, researchers have evidence that consuming watermelon daily can be a natural weapon against high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases.
       Watermelon provides abundant sources of vitamin A, B6, C, fiber, potassium and lycopene, a powerful antioxidant.  Watermelon may even help to reduce serum glucose levels, according to researchers.  


  • Gadsden County will not be known as "The Capital of Comfort Food."
    It was close though, as the tourism marketing experts were ready to package up and brand Gadsden as the perfect place to visit for culinary support and satisfaction. The kind you get from comfort food.
    Lisa Garcia, with Ron Sachs Communications, spoke about the concept at the Jan. 10 meeting of the Gadsden County Tourist Development Council.

  • On the heels of a successful summer music concert MainStreet Quincy is gearing up for the Oktober Fest Blues Festival on Oct. 8 and 9.

        Jack McLean, Quincy city manager,  said the aim is still to bring people to the downtown area to help merchants. He said the Sept. 10 concert featuring local talent, N'Spire, has pleased merchants and vendors.

        "All of the vendors sold out. These people are putting out their hard earned money. They are making an investment in our community and we want to help," McLean said.

  • When you think of "home grown" a certain level of comfort comes to mind. The familiar but yet different. This Friday night the Music in the Square event will feature home-grown talent. Even the group's name "N'Spire" came from Gadsden County resident Darryl Figgers who, when he first heard the group perform, ran up to vocalist LaTrenda Gainous-Goldwire and began hugging her. He repeated several times that the group inspired him.

        The fun starts at 7 p.m. on the east lawn of the Courthouse Square.

  • Harambee, in Swahili, means working together toward a common goal. This weekend at the Chatthaoochee Boys and Girls Club Harambee, that common goal was getting student off to a good start for the 2010-2011 school year. But it was no ordinary. The theme this year was "An Awareness Symposium for Emerging Leaders. Through out the  two-day back to school event, club members were referred to as "young leaders."

  • Forty teenage boys from West Gadsden High School spent Friday night together at the first "Boyz Night Out Lock-In and Basketball Shootout" in the school's gymnasium. Students in grades 6-12 took part in the 18-hour event which was sponsored by the Gadsden County Juvenile Justice Council and West Gadsden High School. The boys were also joined by their fathers and mentors.

  • It was the biggest headline of 1962, possibly the biggest of that decade.

    And 48 years later it still touches the lives and the congregation of a venerable Quincy church.

    "Tragic Drownings Sadden County" screamed the front page of the Gadsden County Times to a community still in shock.

    That Saturday -- Aug. 18, 1962 -- a horrific accident turned a Sunday school outing into a tragedy beyond belief for the small community of Quincy.

  • The summer heat combined with afternoon showers is good for growing but it has presented somewhat of a problem for the city of Quincy's public works department.

        "Kudzu is a problem. it seems to be growing faster this year and there's a lot more of it. At one time we mainly had it round out retention ponds, but now it seems to be everywhere. It's cause us to have to do a lot more work to keep it from taking over," said interim Public Works & Parks and Recreation Department director Gene Sutton.

  • Her shoulders shuddered slightly when her son started over to her front row seat with his pretty bouquet. She sobbed quietly for an instant out of shear pride and delight.

     

    Why wouldn’t she? Her first born son, Master Sergeant Ward, (He’d always be Pee Wee to her.) Heffner was retiring after 25 years of active duty from the U.S. Air Force.

     

    Ward  Monroe Heffner, Jr. was born in Monticello, Fla. in 1967, ( incidentally, the year I was medically retired from the Coast Guard).

     

  • “Am I lucky, or what?” I said to myself as I drove my shiny red sports car along Kamehameha Highway in Hawaii. I was on my way to find a date with some gorgeous girl on Waikiki Beach.

     

    The sun was shining in that big, beautiful Hawaiian sky. The birds were singing, and the engine in my 1960 TR3 (Triumph) was purring. I had the top down, and I was feeling on top of the world.

     

    My good buddy, Keith Tennier, was stationed aboard a Coast Guard buoy tender, the Basswood, and would be out to sea for about three months.

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  • Cpl. and Mrs. Thomas J. Strohecker, stationed at MCAS in Beaufort, S.C., welcomed their first child April 27, 2010.

    Taylor Jocelyn Strohecker was born at 3:31 p.m., weighing 7 pounds, 4 ounces, and measuring 19 3/4 inches. She was born at Beaufort Memorial Hospital.

    Maternal grandparents are David McPhaul of Greensboro and Sherrie McPhaul of Crawfordville. Maternal great-grandmother is Ina Miley of Greensboro.

  • Eleven years ago a sign was erected on Old Bainbridge Road near Shade Farm Road, 4.4 miles north of the Quincy city limits, proclaiming that St. John Church of God in Christ was coming soon.

    "The sign was up there so long that it became an embarrassment because people kept asking when the church was coming," said Rev. Ronald McCloud, the church’s pastor. Neither McCloud nor the congregation, which includes about 100, never gave up. The church, McCloud said, has been a part of their vision since they acquired the 10-acre property in 1995.

  • • First Baptist Church in Quincy holds Sunday School each week at 9:45 a.m., followed by worship at 10:55. Sunday evening worship begins at 6 p.m. Sunday morning worship services are broadcast on Sunday events at 6 p.m. on 93.3 FM.

    • Church services at Mt. Pilgrim Primitive Baptist Church are held the first, second and fourth Sundays at 11 a.m., and at 8 a.m. on the third Sunday of each month. Church school begins at 9:45 a.m. each Sunday morning.

  • Ella Griffin and Maxie Moore, along with Margaret W. Gammon and David Wooden (Laveatrice), all of Quincy, are pleased to announce the marriage of their children, Maxie Griffin and Marilyn L. Wooden.

    The bride is a detention deputy for the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office. The groom is employed as a truck driver for Duncan Trucking.

    The wedding was held April 24 at Quincy Community Deliverance Church of God in Christ. A reception at the Quincy Conference Center followed the ceremony.

  • Mr. and Mrs. David Thompson of Perry, along with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Vann of Greenville, are pleased to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their children, Rebecca Lauren Thompson and Joseph Lee Vann Jr.