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Today's Opinions

  • Taking up space

    I was looking for something in that little closet by the bathroom where we keep guest towels, Band-Aids, sun tan lotion, mosquito repellent and such. Up on the top shelf there was a metal guard the hospital used when they set Josh’s broken arm. A little closer examination revealed the ace bandage used to strap it on. Folks, Josh was in the first grade when he broke that arm. Today, he is on the back side of 30 and expecting his second and third child in May. And we’re still holding on to his arm brace.

  • Take a good look before you start the applause

    At first glance, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act appears to be a good idea. The bill states that it will modernize the nation’s infrastructure, enhance America’s energy independence, expand educational opportunities, preserve and improve affordable health care, provide tax relief and protect those in greatest need. OK, it sounds great. Bottom line: it’s supposed to stimulate the economy and create jobs.

  • Stop trashing our roadsides

    If our roadsides are littered with trash, it's mostly us who's doing it. No one is sneaking into the county at night and throwing old washing machines, refrigerators and household garbage on roadsides. When Robert Presnell informed Gadsden County commissioners it's costing the taxpayers $1 million a year. That is money we are thowing away. Just think of what this county could do with a million dollars.

  • I can quit anytime...really...

    Anyone who knows me well knows that I have a profile in Facebook, which I check via my cell phone several times a day. It’s a great way to stay in touch with family and friends. It’s also one of the quickest ways to reach me.

    If you’re not familiar with Facebook, it’s a social network on the Internet. You can sign up for free, and you can e-mail people, add photos, post notes and update your status frequently – your status is however you’re feeling or whatever you’re doing at any given moment.

  • Braggers' rights are yours for the taking

    I hear it all the time. People, mostly males, bragging on their barbecue. They have secret recipes, secret sauces, secret ways to build a fire and secret wood or charcoal. Wherever the male mystique with the cooking of meats over an open flame came from, it has lasted since lightning set fire to a tree and some unsuspecting animal was cooked.

  • Just about reached the end of my pencil

    In March of 1984 Iran accused Iraq of using chemical weapons. I remember thinking, "Who cares?" The only reason I’d ever heard of either place was because back in junior high Miss Velna Gray Paschall made us learn the major food crops of every nation in the world (rye, barley, oats, wheat and corn for both, in case you are interested). That same year, “Terms of Endearment” won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Again, I didn’t care. I was pulling for, “The Return of Billy Jack.” The Macintosh computer was introduced in 1984.

  • There's nothing wrong with it; we're just making it better

    As I was leaving the paper one evening recently, I met up with a delightful older woman who, after retrieving a paper from our box out front, asked, “What’s wrong with this paper?”

    She was referring to the size of the paper. If you’re a regular reader, you’ve probably noticed the size of the paper has narrowed a bit. I have written about that before. It’s because, as I explained to my new friend that evening, we’ve changed printers. The move has helped us keep costs low for us and for our readership.

  • We beat 'em and got bottled water in return

    The North Koreans have fired (OK, semi-fired) off a ballistic missile. Iran is bragging loudly to anyone who will listen of their growing nuclear program. Every day it seems some wannabe world power is on the brink of attacking or at least posturing to do harm to anyone it feels led to point a finger at. It can be a little unnerving.

    Someone commented around the water cooler this week that it would be nice to live in the “idyllic 1950s where no such threats and innuendos existed and everyone lived in peace and harmo—”