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Today's News

  • Headed to Virginia

    Five East Gadsden High School seniors are headed to Virginia University of Lynchburg.
    East Gadsden varsity football standouts LaDarion Lee, Malik Rollins, Thomas Jones, Ke’Terrius Deans and Danny Baker signed scholarship letters of intent on Tuesday.  Next year they will all hit the field as Dragons, playing for Virginia University of Lynchburg.
    Dozens of people packed East Gadsden’s TV Production Room for the signing, most of whom were the athletes’ families and fellow students.

  • His legacy lives on

    Alphonso Figgers spent most of his life fighting to abolish the death penalty in Florida.  
    Figgers, 65, who died at home on April 26, was laid to rest Saturday.  His funeral was Saturday at New Bethel A.M.E. in Quincy.
    Figgers was part of the Quincy Five, a group of young black men from Quincy who were charged and convicted in the 1970 murder of a Leon County sheriff’s
    deputy.  

  • May Day merriment comes to Gretna

    The City of Gretna’s annual May Day Celebration on Friday, May 6 ,drew hundreds of people.  
    Children jumped in bounce houses and climbed up inflatable slides, giggling as they slid down.  The adults mingled,  laughing and talking as they stood around, or sat in chairs, while enjoying the live music.

  • You’re fired – please don’t quit

    At their May 4 meeting, Midway City Council Members votes were divided when it came to renewing the City Manager Auburn Ford’s contract.  
    Midway Mayor Wanda Range and Council Members Ronald Colston and Carolyn Francis voted to not renew the contract, while Charlie Smith and Sam Stevens voted in favor of renewing it.
    Colston recommended having a law enforcement officer retrieve the keys from Ford and shutting down city hall until they found someone to replace him.       

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church: Preacher, poet and educator Cupid A. Whitfield

    By Canter Brown Jr.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church: Allen Jones Sr., and the origins of St. John’s Mission

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the eighth in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church: origins of the Chattahoochee Mission

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the seventh in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.
    The Chattahoochee area and northwestern Gadsden have enjoyed an African Methodist Episcopal (AME) presence almost since the denomination put down its roots in the county following the Civil War’s end in 1865.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church, Alexander C. Lightbourne and Mary Zeigler Lightbourne

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the sixth in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.

    A diversity of influences radiated outward to the state and nation from Gadsden County’s AME churches in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The lives and experiences of Alexander C. Lightbourne and Mary Zeigler Lightbourne offer excellent cases on point.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church and the Rev. Albert Julius Kershaw

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the fifth in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with
    Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.

    Gadsden County’s pioneer African Methodist congregations produced or fostered a striking number of men and women who not only touched the community but also the state and nation. Their impacts ranged from pastoral to political, academic to artistic.

  • Arnett Chapel AME Church and the Rev. Robert Meacham

    By Canter Brown Jr.