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Today's News

  • Lawson hosts town hall meeting in Quincy

    U.S. Rep. Al Lawson hosted a town hall meeting Wednesday, April 19 in Quincy.
    More than two-dozen people attended the meeting where he discussed a number of concerns raised by constituents.
    “We were fortunate to get Congressman Lawson as our congressman,” County Commissioner Brenda Holt said. “From Duval to Gadsden, we could’ve gotten anyone.”
    Lawson said he is very honored to have the opportunity to represent Gadsden County in Congress.  He said the past three months have been a fast-tracked learning experience.

  • County to help food pantry find home

    A food pantry housed in the historic Stevens School destroyed last month in a devastating fire will have a temporary home.
    At the April 18 meeting, Gadsden County Commissioners voted unanimously to allow the food pantry to move into a county building on a month-to-month basis until it can be relocated to a more suitable spot and a formal lease is in place.

  • Hoping for a game-changer

    A bill introduced by state Senator Bill Galvano could change the game for Creek Entertainment Gretna.
    On April 13, the bill went to the conference committee because the House of Representatives refused to concur, according to the Florida Senate’s official website.
    For a bill to become state law, both the House and the Senate must pass it.  The second house frequently amends and returns the bill to the house of origin.  

  • Thousands helped by foodbank volunteers

    Farm Share, in partnership with Florida Department of Children and Families, distributed more than 100,320 pounds in Quincy on Friday.
    Well over 400 cars went through the line as volunteers loaded them up with goods.

  • Bicycle race returning to downtown Quincy

    The popular RedEye Velo bicycle race is slated to return to Quincy next month.
    In their April 11 meeting, Quincy Police Chief Glenn Sapp told Quincy City Council members the event in the past has been very well attended.  He recommended that RedEye Velo pay for security for the event.  He said he will touch bases with local businesses to make sure the races that will take place on May 27 do not inconvenience them.
    Mayor Derrick Elias said he wants a contractual agreement that states RedEye Velo will be responsible for security.

  • Honoring a heart for service

    On Palm Sunday, members of United Gadsden met at New Bethel A.M.E. Church to present their “Making a Difference” Awards to seven public servants.
    The Rev. Lee Plummer, Kimblin NeSmith, the Rev. Gwen Carroll-Simmons, Elder Tyrone Smith, the Rev. Eddie Allen, Pastor Julius Harris and Chief Glenn Sapp were recognized for keeping Jesus’ mandate to go into all the world and serve.

  • Teacher under suspicion of being high at school

    A West Gadsden High School teacher is under investigation after fellow teachers and students reported that he acted as if he might be under the influence on the job.
    According to a Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office incident report, this what  happened:
    On March 21, Brenda Sizemore, the school resource deputy was notified that Principal James Mills asked for her to check on a teacher.
    Students and staff had reported to Mills that the teacher’s behavior was abnormal.

  • Dekendrick Ford's verdict in

     After six hours of deliberation, the jury has returned a verdict in the Dekendrick Ford case. Ford was found not guilty of the 2011 murder of his girlfriend Teresa Manuel. Read more in next week's edition of The Gadsden County Times.

  • County leaders honor teen employees

    County honors teen summer employees
    By Erin Hill
    The Gadsden County Commission hosted a reception for the county’s summer youth employees.
    The teens and their families were invited to Gadsden County’s seniors center for dinner as they received awards for their hard work.
    Kiara Walls and Imani Whitehead were among the teens who had summer jobs through the county program.
    Walls who worked at Carter-Parramore Academy under Frances Harrell said, “It was a good experience to work with the kids and actually have a job.”

  • Honoring his memory

    The rain did not dampen the spirits of those celebrating the life of Minister Alphono Figgers at a park dedication on Saturday.
    The city of Quincy has renamed Shaw Quarters Park after Figgers.  He worked diligently to get the park in the community he grew up in.  Figgers, who died in April, was not only a lifetime resident of Quincy, but also a human rights activist after he was convicted of murder as one of the “Quincy Five” and later exonerated.  He had a strong presence in the Gadsden County community.