.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • School board tackles consolidation plan

    After months of debate and community meetings, a decision has been made: Gadsden County will have one high school next school year.
    There was standing room only at the April 4 Gadsden County School Board meeting as the board voted on the fate of West Gadsden High, Gretna Elementary and St. John Elementary schools.
    In the end, all the reconfiguration motions passed, though with the smallest possible margin: 3-2.

  • Event honors late physician’s legacy, supports Big Bend Hospice

    Big Bend Hospice Gadsden invited the community Saturday to their annual Dr. Jessie Furlow Memorial benefit dinner.
    The event, which was held at the Golf Club of Quincy, drew dozens.
    The yearly event recognizes Furlow’s contributions.  She was one of Gadsden County’s most beloved physicians.  
    There were live and silent auctions, and entertainment by Stanley DuPont and Tallahassee Nights Live.

  • Library supports beloved staffer with fundraiser

    This past Monday, the Gadsden County Public Library in Quincy hosted a cookout fundraiser to help Joan Vann, a library employee who lost her home in a fire on March 19.
    Vann, who is the Bookmobile librarian, said, “I’m just overwhelmed.  I work with the best here in Gadsden County at the Library.”
    Vann said her husband was in the house when the fire started, but made it out unharmed.
    “The blessing in the whole thing was no life was lost,” Vann said.    

  • Quincy Main Street earns statewide acclaim

    Quincy Main Street has been designated the April 2017 Florida Program of the Month.  Secretary of State Ken Detzner made the announcement last week.
    According to a press release, communities are selected based on their developmental achievements and participation in the Florida Main Street Program.  Quincy has been apart of the Florida Main Street Program since 1987.

  • Teacher under suspicion of being high at school

    A West Gadsden High School Teacher is under investigation after fellow teachers and students reported that he acted as if he might be under the influence on the job.  Read more in the April 13 edition of The Gadsden County Times.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church: Preacher, poet and educator Cupid A. Whitfield

    By Canter Brown Jr.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church: Allen Jones Sr., and the origins of St. John’s Mission

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the eighth in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church: origins of the Chattahoochee Mission

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the seventh in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.
    The Chattahoochee area and northwestern Gadsden have enjoyed an African Methodist Episcopal (AME) presence almost since the denomination put down its roots in the county following the Civil War’s end in 1865.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church, Alexander C. Lightbourne and Mary Zeigler Lightbourne

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the sixth in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.

    A diversity of influences radiated outward to the state and nation from Gadsden County’s AME churches in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The lives and experiences of Alexander C. Lightbourne and Mary Zeigler Lightbourne offer excellent cases on point.

  • Gadsden County’s AME Church and the Rev. Albert Julius Kershaw

    By Canter Brown Jr.
    Editor’s note: This is the fifth in a series of articles sponsored by New Bethel AME Church History Project with
    Dr. Brown serving as consulting historian. The Rev. Charles Morris pastors New Bethel.

    Gadsden County’s pioneer African Methodist congregations produced or fostered a striking number of men and women who not only touched the community but also the state and nation. Their impacts ranged from pastoral to political, academic to artistic.