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Today's News

  • Girls softball action sees wins

    The Robert F. Munroe Lady Cats softball team moved to an even 3-3 on the season at the conclusion of last week, winning one and losing one. 

    On Thursday night Maclay ruled the Lady Cats 12-2.  Maclay scored five runs in an error-filled third inning and then pushed six more across in the fifth and sixth innings. 

    Haleigh Corbally got the loss on the mound.  The freshman stuck out four and walked five. Corbally did help her cause from the plate getting two hits and three RBIs. Mary Jane Milam and Spenser Morris each had a hit with an RBI. 

  • Local conference helps residents learn to be financially savvy

    William Marshall came from Tallahassee last Thursday morning to attend the second annual GadsdenSaves seminar on becoming financially savvy and debt free. At 80 years old, Marshall said he was not worried about debt but about how he would be able to pay for long-term care in case he has to live in a nursing home. His attention was on how the reverse mortgage program works. Before the end of the seminar, he knew his options.

  • Community Calendar

    The Gadsden County NAACP Branch meets every second and fourth Thursday of each month at Union Hall at 6:30 p.m. All interested citizens are invited to attend and join. This branch will host its annual banquet March 28 at New Bethel AME Church’s Multippurpose Center at 6 p.m. Contact Sam Palmer at 627-2673 for information and tickets.

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  • Church Briefs

    • First Baptist Church in Quincy holds Sunday School each week at 9:45 a.m., followed by worship at 10:55. Sunday evening worship begins at 6 p.m. Sunday morning worship services are broadcast on Sunday events at 6 p.m. on 93.3 FM.

    • Church services at Mt. Pilgrim Primitive Baptist Church are held the first, second and fourth Sundays at 11 a.m., and at 8 a.m. on the third Sunday of each month. Church school begins at 9:45 a.m. each Sunday morning.

  • Black History parade set for this weekend

    The 27th annual Black History Parade and Festival will be held Saturday in downtown Quincy.

    Parade organizer Anthony Powell said there won't be any changes from last year’s format. The parade, which features marching bands, floats, walking units and civic organizations, will begin at 11 a.m., with lineup at 10 a.m. at the corner of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and South Stewart Street.

    Any individual or groups that want to participate in the parade can preregister or register on site.The is no cost to participate in the parade.

  • Sheriff gets less than half of funds requested

    Gadsden County Sheriff Morris Young didn't get the $500,000 he asked for during a county commission workshop last week, but commissioners did vote to give him $200,000. The money will be used to help the sheriff meet some of the operating costs at the jail that he says have caused his law enforcement budget to fall short.

    "I've talked to the sheriff and he's fine with this. This is what we're doing and what we can afford. He knows the fiscal constraints this county is under," said Commission Chairman Eugene Lamb.

  • Local leaders await word on how much, if any, federal stimulus dollars will wind up in Gadsden County

    While county leadership awaits word on whether Gadsden County will receive any federal stimulus package funding and, if so, how much, governors throughout the country have expressed optimism that the package President Barack Obama has signed will provide some much-needed relief for states.

    State leaders are saying that the money will prevent further budget cuts and unemployment rate increases.

  • County honors its own

    Twelve-year county commissioner Sterling Watson, surrounded by his family, at top, was presented a plaque from Commission Chairman Eugene Lamb last Tuesday night during the regular meeting of the board. Former county commissioner Carolyn Roberson accepts a plaque expressing appreciation for her service as a member of the board. She was also joined by her family. Sammy Dowds was presented a Certificate of Appreciation and a clock for 35 years of service.

  • Local leaders meet, discuss upcoming anti-gang campaign

    "There was a time when, if you talked about gangs, you could pretty much bet that they were in the inner city. All of that has changed," said Tony Parker, a minister who has devoted his life to helping young people make the right choices.

  • New Midway city manager looking to put the town on the map

    Agatha Muse Salters says she's more than just a Midway native – she's someone who loves the town enough to see its future, built on its strong past and supported by an ever-changing present.

    Salters, who began working as the town's city manager in December 2008, interviewed for the position more than once, and when they called her back for another interview, she was hesitant. But after some reassurance that the town meant business, she interviewed a final time in November, and was offered the job.