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Today's News

  • A mixed up bag of crow

    I had very mixed emotions last week.

    As I was working on the graduation section for this week’s edition, I made numerous calls to local schools, as well as contact via e-mail. I was seeking photos of graduates, as well as information on any scholarships the students had received.

    Some schools were incredibly accommodating. Some were not. It was really frustrating.

    But despite the frustration, the worst of it all came the day of East Gadsden High School’s graduation.

  • Just stick to the TV schedule

    It's almost time for the baseball A-Star game and we're still waiting for the basketball championships to be over. That's great for basketball fans who, I'm sure, would like to see it year round. But for the rest of us who like sports seasons, these extended season are getting on my nerves.

  • Watch where you're jumping...now and in the future

    Leon said you couldn’t truly qualify to graduate unless you had passed the “initiation” test. “They can give you the paper but it won’t mean a thing unless you can prove you are ready,” is exactly how he put it.  He was the oldest brother and naturally a lot more worldly than the rest of us.

  • Residents urged to participate in census

    The 2010 census is so important to the city of Quincy that Jack McLean, city manager, formed a census committee among department heads last Thursday.

    "This is critical to the city. We have to make sure people are counted. I feel one of the reasons that Quincy has not gotten its fair share of state and federal funds is that people were not counted properly in 2000," he said.

  • This could actually work

    In the months that followed Hurricane Katrina, I had the opportunity to interview several people who had fled New Orleans. None of them planned to return.

    I can’t say that I blame them.

    But it would be very difficult to leave your home, especially if it’s all you’ve ever known, and move elsewhere to start all over.

    I’ve seen coverage of New Orleans and other areas since that storm proclaiming the fact that many of those areas have been slow to recover, particularly the Big Easy.

  • She's quit and I'm a happy camper

    Listen guys, I got the break of the century this past week. My wife quit teaching! After 35 years, she retired. I was never so happy in my life. You have no idea what I have had to live through.

    She taught fifth grade for years. I would sit down at the dinner table after a long day ready to just relax and eat my peas and cornbread in the solace of my own home. “I’m worried about Johnny. He’s falling behind in math. I’ve tried to help him after school but he seems distracted.”

  • We're not going anywhere...but what if we did?

    I was recently watching one of those news programs on cable, and they had a live call-in bit going. The question they posed was this: “If your local newspaper went away, would you miss it?”

    People called in, e-mailed and twittered their responses. For the most part, at least while I was watching, people were saying they would definitely miss their local paper.

  • If you're not doing anything wrong, the ordinance won't affect you

    I don't see anything wrong with the proposed youth protection ordinance. In essence, the ordinance calls for a curfew and does not allow minors (people under 17 years old who have not been emancipated) to hang out between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m.

    The ordinance is partially the result of citizen complaints about kids roaming the streets at night, fighting and loitering around businesses. Police chief Ferman Richardson said the ordinance is also intended to protect minors from victimization and criminal activity as well as promote parental control and responsibility.

  • Take a great big whiff of the best month of the year...June

    I discovered the wonderful month of June when I was 7 years old. We finished cutting out George and Abe’s heads in Miss Carolyn Blades’ first grade class in the middle of February. That was OK. But March must not have been a good month for presidents. We just did arithmetic and reading, and every Friday we lined up for those gosh-awful spelling contests. May was no better and it began to get insufferably hot in that small class room.

    “When does this thing end?”

  • First Baptist youth seek to make a ‘huge difference in this place’

    When you take a look at fingerprints closely, it’s easy to see two things: everyone has them and each person’s prints are unique.

    Using fingerprints as fodder for a lesson for both themselves and the children they served last week, 17 teens and their leaders, a total of about 22 people, embarked on a unique mission to serve their community and their Lord.

    Mike Park, minister of students, said the youth at First Baptist Church in Quincy wanted to do something locally to help their own community.