.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Kudzu really likes Quincy

    The summer heat combined with afternoon showers is good for growing but it has presented somewhat of a problem for the city of Quincy's public works department.

        "Kudzu is a problem. it seems to be growing faster this year and there's a lot more of it. At one time we mainly had it round out retention ponds, but now it seems to be everywhere. It's cause us to have to do a lot more work to keep it from taking over," said interim Public Works & Parks and Recreation Department director Gene Sutton.

  • City votes to switch power providers

        Jack McLean, city manager, said he has delivered on his promise to look for a power provider that would save citizens money. While the rates of purchase may remain the same, the cost of delivering power (fuel adjustment charge) may be lower, he said.

        And it could mean the end of Quincy's relationship with Progress Energy.

  • Early voting starts Aug. 9

    In less than two weeks voters who don't want to wait until the primary election day can begin casting heir ballots by voting early. Or, they can request now to have a absentee ballot sent to their place of residence.

        Aug. 9 through Aug. 21 are early voting dates. The locations are:

        • Supervisor of Elections Office

         16 S. Madison Street

          Quincy

        • Chattahoochee Public Library

          300 Maple Street

  • Hispanic-American Basketball League is a family affair
  • Gadsden County suicide rate soars

    Since January of this year 27 Gadsden County residents have attempted suicide and 12 have been successful. The problem has Sheriff Morris Young searching for answers and looking for help anywhere he can find it.

        "That's too many people for a county our size, it could become epidemic. At the rate we're going we may have 25 deaths by suicide by the end of the year," he said.

         By comparison, according to state data, Gadsden County only recorded six suicides in 2008.

  • Historic church marks milestone

    It sits on the corner of Duval and Clark streets in Quincy, almost a stone's throw from the courthouse steps. It is on the city's historic registry and is featured as a place of interest in the city's publication called "On The Trail in Historic Quincy."

  • Young tumbler takes AAU gold medals

    As a little girl Megan Haire loved to tumble, flip and do head stands. Her parents, Scott and Deloris Haire, thought they'd better channel that energy into something safe and productive. She could still do what she liked but under the supervision of professionals.

    The couple sought out Murkerson's Gymnastics School in Bainbridge, Ga. three years ago and enrolled Megan.

        There, the family met owner Melynda Murkerson, who became Megan's coach. The hours of training have begun paying off.

  • FCAT math scores don't add up

    Upon publication of the 2010 FCAT results last month several school districts, including Gadsden immediately saw results that raised red flags. As a result nearly every Florida school district has requested further evaluation, specifically as it relates to the learning gains of the 25 percent lowest performing students throughout the state.

  • Two die in crash, three hurt

    Two people were killed and three injured early Sunday afternoon when two SUVs collided on Pat Thomas Parkway (267), south of Interstate 10. Teresa Hemanes, 54, a passenger in the green vehicle and Geroge Synder,  54, the driver and only person in the white vehicle died at the scene.

        Three others in the green vehicle, Clyde Fletcher, 52, Kristina Mendoza, 34, and a 8-year-old girl whose name was not released, were hospitalized and are listed in fair to serious condition. All of the victims are from Quincy.

  • Hospital exceeds county's expectations

    It's been a month since Capital Regional Medical Center Gadsden Memorial Campus opened its door for business. And all expectations have been exceeded in a good way, said assistant county attorney Michael Glazer, in an oral report to the Gadsden County Board of Commissioners during their regular meeting on July 6.

         "We been averaging 45 to 50 patients per day which is about double what we expected and a lot of them are covered by private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid," he said.