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Today's News

  • Long lines form as locals try to beat tag cost increase this week

    "I've never seen anything like it," said Gadsden County Tax Collector Dale Summerford Monday night.

    He was referring to the crowds that swamped his office beginning Aug. 28 to  take advantage of the old tag and license fees that took effect Sept.1, when prices doubled. The office, which usually handles less than 100 people per day, served 750 Monday.

  • Elected officials visit, talk health care, economy, stimulus dollars

    Sen. Bill Nelson sat down with local community and government leaders last Thursday afternoon in the conference room of the Gadsden County Chamber of Commerce in Quincy.

    As the meeting began, Nelson asked those present what issues were on their minds. Foremost among those issues were health care reform, the Apalachicola River, the economic forecast and stimulus dollars.

  • Boyd met with strong questions, even stronger answers at gathering

    There were only a few seats left at the Leaf Theatre Aug. 25 as U.S. Congressman Allen Boyd opened a town meeting to discuss the health care initiative. He said most of the people in the room were raised by parents whose lives were shaped by the Great Depression and many people are losing their jobs and their homes – and people are "scared."

    "I'm delighted you're here. You were told last September that our financial institutions were about to collapse. That didn't happen but we never get credit for averting disaster," Boyd said.

  • Board must act to save hospital

    The Gadsden County Board of Commissioners have a tough decision to make and they must make it soon according to Michael Glazer, attorney for Gadsden Hospital Inc. Board of Directors, who laid the board’s options on the line Tuesday.

  • City to look closely at rec department

    The Quincy City Commission took pencil to paper last Wednesday and Thursday nights during the first two of three budget workshops planned before September public hearings to adopt the 2009-10 budget.

    Commissioners studied the proposed budget almost line by line in an attempt to lower spending while continuing to provided services at a level to please citizens.

  • Breathe in long and hard...there's a fresh wind blowing

    There’s a fresh wind blowing across Gadsden County. Can you feel it?

    I’m talking about the new excitement in the schools and at the administrative level. It started with the shifting around of personnel, not because district leaders wanted to move people out of positions, but because the skills of those administrators and teachers would be better utilized elsewhere. Principals who have led their former schools to higher levels of achievement have been moved to schools that were faltering, and we can be sure their new schools are already on the rise.

  • Waiting in line's not so bad

    Standing in line doesn't have to be a bad experience. On Aug. 28 I had the good fortune of waiting in line for almost an hour to get a tag for my car. A few months ago I interviewed Dale Summerford, county tax collector, about the increase in fees and licenses that took effect Sept. 1.

  • The problem with health reform isn't the reform part

    I can tell you the problem with the heath care “reform.” The proposed legislation is 1,000 pages long! Hello! Gibbon’s extraordinarily wordy and detailed description of “The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire” wasn’t much longer. And it took six volumes and covered centuries. “War and Peace” came and went with fewer pages. “Gone with the Wind” was barely a thousand pages. And I couldn’t make it through it; I fell asleep around about the time Scarlett took her third husband.   

  • Along Twin Ponds Road

    I was doing my early morning XM radio channel surfing when my ears caught a bouncy and light tune that also seem vaguely familiar.  I turned around to view the window on my radio which revealed I was listening to an Aaron Copland piece.  It was called "Duo for Flute and Piano."

  • We can do better than the health care we have in place

    I am writing to encourage readers to support efforts to offer health insurance for all Americans.  I want to bypass arguments that have been made by experts on both sides.

    This is a guts and glory appeal.

    We need to address the health insurance issue the American way: Determine that we will do the right thing. With right on our side, figure out how to overcome the obstacles. Make it work right, rather than whimper about some imaginary doomsday.