.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Havana karate students compete in First Coast Open, bring home plethora of awards

    Alpha UPKUDO Martial Arts in Havana competed in the First Coast Open in Jacksonville and won 14 trophies with eight students competing. The results are as follows:

    • Brandon Keefer: second place, Black Belt Men Fighting; second place, Black Belt Men Kata; third place, Black Belt Weapons

    • Amy Harbin: second place, Black Belt Women Kata; third place, Black Belt women Fighting

    • Ganine Gerald: first place, Brown Belt Women Fighting; first place, Brown Belt Women Kata

  • RFM Lady Cats topple Rickards

    The Robert F. Munroe softball team lost one, won one and had a game suspended in a busy week on the diamond last week.  

    On Tuesday the Lady Cats faced Franklin County at the new school on the coast.  The game was scoreless until the bottom of the third when Franklin County struck for four runs.  Munroe battled back in the fourth and fifth scoring four runs of their own but the Seahawks went on a tear to finish up as 10-4 winners.

  • Church News

    • New Beginnings Assembly of God in Havana is hosting “Living an Extraordinary Life,” to help attendees answer the question, “Can my life get any better?” The programs are being held on Sunday morningsat 10:30 a.m.. For more information, call 364-5137.

    • Take it to the Streets Ministry Inc. hosts a community Bible study at Carter-Parramore Academy the first and third Monday each month at 7 p.m. Refreshments are served.

  • Community Calendar

    The Caring Tree Program of Big Bend Hospice will host a special event called “Lighting the Darkness” March 22 at 6 p.m. at the Tallahassee Museum, 3495 Museum Drive.  This event, to remember lives lost to suicide, will feature informational tables, luminary lighting and a remembrance ceremony including music by Illuminare:  For more information, contact Pam Mezzina at 878-5310, ext. 799, or pam@bigbendhospice.org.  

    ••••

  • Don't you aim that thing at me, Diaper Boy

    Well...it’s upon us again. Valentine’s Day. My Facebook profile currently explains my thoughts on the subject: “Cupid shot me with an arrow so I pulled his wings out.”

    As I walk the aisles in local stores, and I see the singing stuffed animals and heart-shaped paraphernalia, I lose all hope for romance. It’s all so...commercial.

    I think Valentine’s Day needs a makeover.

    The reason Valentine's Day needs changing is the same reason a baby needs changing: It stinks and it nauseates people.

  • Buckle up or pay up

    For years I have cringed when I see people driving down the street with children, often babies,  in the front seat sitting in someone's lap. Or children in the back, kneeling in the seat, waving to other motorists with their little faces pressed to the window. These children are obviously not in a child restraint device.

  • Folks, we're getting plowed

    I haven’t editorialized the proposed biomass plant in Gretna because I’ve been writing about it, and didn’t feel it was fair to state my opinion on the matter while I am covering it.

    But there are some things that have been drawn to my attention that I feel I need to address in this format.

    First of all, ADAGE has said one of the best things about having its facility in Gadsden County would be the contributions it will make to the tax base. Is this before or after the estimated 80 percent tax abatement ADAGE plans to ask the county for?

  • More than just an officer; he was a gentleman

    I don't know how many young lives former Quincy Police Officer Theotis Moore touched. If anyone could count them it would, I'm sure, number in the thousands. Moore, before he retired 2 years ago, was the Drug Abuse Resistance Education officer. He travelled throughout the county from school to school and gathering to gathering in his white van with the big red DARE letters on the side. The message he carried was don't use drugs, stay away from gangs and stay in school.

  • Disgruntled doesn't begin to describe it

    Last week’s biomass summit was a true disappointment for me...for a lot of reasons.

    First of all, chaos reigned, and not much was accomplished. The moderator was, bless his heart, trying to moderate, but did too much preaching and not enough moderating in my humble opinion. A firmer hand was definitely needed.

    The panel was disappointing. It was stacked with people in support of the Gretna biomass plant, including an ADAGE official. The only exception was a member of the Gadsden County Concerned Citizens group. It should have been more balanced.

  • A handshake and a thank you...all this volunteer needs

    About a year ago, I volunteered to become a mentor in what is not your everday program – this one is special. It's called "Children With Promise" and it pairs women and men with children who have at least one parent incarcerated.  It's more social mentoring than academic.