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Today's News

  • Havana facade grants approved

    Getting in shape was on the minds of Havana Town Council members at their Jan. 27 meeting thanks to a visit from Rachel Guy of Gadsden County’s health department.
    During the time for public comment,  Guy, a senior health educator of Gasdsen County, explained the reason for her visit.
    Guy is part of Get Going Gasden: Healthiest Weight Initiative.
    “We really want people to get healthy and so far we have over 200 participants who are ready to get fit. The only problem is we have no participants in Havana.”

  • Two weeks to settle facts in furlough case

    The judge presiding over State Attorney Willie Meggs’ contempt of court case against Sheriff Morris Young decided Monday to give attorneys on both sides two weeks to come to an agreement over what the facts are concerning Young’s use of jail furloughs and what needs to be determined when the case goes to trial.

  • Burglar targets Quincy cellphone business

    It was business as usual Monday morning at Page Plus in Quincy, with store owner Willie Lanier and his employee cracking jokes and entertaining guests between helping customers understand how to use their new smartphones. You would never have known the store had been burglarized the previous Friday.
    According to a Quincy Police Department incident report, an officer was dispatched to PagePlus, located on South Monroe Street, around 8 a.m., finding the store’s window
    shattered.

  • Big aspirations

    About 40 Gadsden County students earned their CPR certification alongside 100 more students from five counties across the state on Florida State University’s campus Friday morning as apart of a program aimed at encouraging students from rural communities to not only become doctors, but to serve as physicians in their native communities.

  • Midway event aims to protect citizens from identity theft

    Crime prevention specialist Kevin Gilpin estimates half of Americans to have been targeted by identity theft in the past two years.

    Gilpin has been working in crime prevention for 35 years, and he says never has one crime impacted so many people as identity theft already has. He thinks the number of people affected by the crime will only increase in the future.

  • State leaders hear from Gadsden

    Legislative interests of the county were relayed to State Sen. Bill Montford and State Rep. Alan Williams by several county officials and residents at a public meeting Jan. 19 in the county commission
    chambers.

    Commission Chairperson Brenda Holt spoke for the BOCC, saying there was a need for infrastructure funding related to municipal buildings such as the courthouse and voiced concern over how Florida’s Medicaid Share of Cost program could create a financial burden for Gadsden County residents.

  • Inspiring young minds
  • Keeping the dream alive in Havana

    Havana hosted its 30th annual celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with a parade that led directly to the steps of New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church, where the celebration took to its second phase in the form of a commemoration service.
    The parade began at approximately 10 a.m., led by a group of pastors and Gadsden County Commissioner Eric Hinson, who acted as grand marshal for the parade, through the residential streets of Havana.

  • Recall vote up to judge

    The decision of whether or not to have a recall election for a Quincy commissioner’s seat now rests in a judge’s hands.
    Commissioner Micah Brown, of District 2, was notified Jan. 7 via letter that an adequate number of signatures on the petition requesting his removal from the commission had been verified.
    The letter states 186 signatures were verified, surpassing the required minimum of 119. It also says at least 15 percent of the qualified voters in that district were certified to have signed the petition.

  • Persistent memory-keeper

    Priscilla Stephens Kruize has high ambitions for the Black Heritage Museum in Quincy.
    She was raised in a segregated school system, arrested many times while protesting for civil rights in the ‘60s, and spent more than a decade living abroad in Africa and Europe. She now wants to bring pieces of the cultures she was privileged to experience to the children of Quincy.