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Today's News

  • Living black history

    Tallahassee Community College’s black history month program provided a stage for the founder of Quincy’s Black Heritage Museum to share the story of her civil rights work Friday morning on the college’s campus.

  • Quincy cleared to pay Brown's legal fees

    A request that would have temporarily disallowed the city of Quincy to use taxpayer funds to pay legal fees related to the recall effort against Commissioner Micah Brown has been denied. 

  • Goodwill to celebrate new digs Friday

    An everlasting topic of discussion in Gadsden County is the need for more opportunities to develop career skills for under- or un-employed job seekers. Goodwill Industries plans to contribute to that effort.

  • One shining evening

    Two high school seniors from Gadsden County were recognized for winning a highly valuable scholarships Saturday night at a banquet for the Biletnikoff Award.

    Camarion Hale and Evelyn Kay Fletcher, from East Gadsden and Robert F. Munroe, respectively, will both be granted a scholarship worth $6,000 to $10,000 and will be granted a housing scholarship for four years of college, covering expenses up to $50,000.

  • Dowdell takes the lead in suing city

    Quincy Commissioner Keith Dowdell is leading a group of residents in suing the city for a decision the city commission made to cover Commissioner Micah Brown’s legal fees in his fight against a recall election.

    In the lawsuit documents, in which the plaintiffs explain their demand for a trial by jury, the decision to pay Brown’s legal fees before he wins his case is described as “an illegal expenditure of public funds.”

  • Young scientists show their skills in science fair

    Some of the county’s most talented science students participated in the district-wide science fair Tuesday morning at St. John Elementary.

    The participants had all won either first or second place in their schools’ science fairs, were in the third, fourth or fifth grades and represented each of the eight district elementary schools except Gadsden Elementary Magnet School.

  • Gretna Police to shed some paperwork

    News of a high-tech tool now available to Gretna police was announced at this past week’s Gretna city commission meeting.
    Gretna Police Chief Carlos De La Cruz told commissioners that the department will become the first accredited police station in Gadsden County due to a new  addition — a document management system.

  • Quincy Shuttle service to resume March 2

    The Quincy Shuttle is being brought back after county commissioners voted to reinstate the service at their Feb. 3 meeting.

    The bus will run Monday through Friday beginning March 2.

    County Administrator Robert Presnell said the county decided to reinstate the Quincy Shuttle as a part of the goal to increase public transportation accessibility throughout the county.

  • Quincy Bypass opens

    After nearly two decades of planning and construction, the Quincy Bypass opened Friday afternoon.
    The road will officially be called State Road 269. It is 1.6 miles in length and will connect the area around Quincy’s Capital Regional Medical Center to the area around the Quincy Municipal Airport. It cost $13 million to complete; $13 million less than
    expected.

  • Former GCSO captain convicted

    TALLAHASSEE — James Corder, 54, a former captain with the Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office, has been convicted on charges of violating the civil rights of an arrestee, obstruction of justice,and making false statements in a federal investigation. The convictions were announced by Pamela C. Marsh, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Florida.