Today's News


    Byron Spires
    Times columnist

  • Havana man surrenders after brief standoff

    On Thursday, Dec. 28, around 8 a.m., Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office responded to a mobile home on Treebark Court in Havana. According to a GCSO press release, the wife of John Clayton Partin had reported to law enforcement that he was distraught and suicidal.
    Deputies attempted to make contact with the man. His wife told them there were weapons in the home, and he had barricaded himself inside. The Leon County Sheriff’s Office and their SWAT and Hostage Negotiations assisted GCSO.

  • New year off to a greens start

    When it comes to New Year’s traditional foods and why people eat them at the start of each year — greens are for the money.  So this past Saturday many people were out buying freshly picked turnips and collards for their New Year’s dinner.
    Greens, black-eyed peas and pork are a well-known southern New Year’s tradition.  According to old stories passed down through generations, the leafy greens, whether turnips, collards, or mustards, represent wealth and prosperity in the new year.

  • 2017 in pictures
  • District announces Teacher of the Year

    The students in Pamela Bryant’s third-grade class were just as excited as she was, if not more when this past Friday, Gadsden Schools Superintendent Roger Milton walked into her classroom. “Please excuse the interruption,” Milton said, just before announcing that Bryant is the 2017-2018 teacher of the year for Gadsden County’s public schools.
    The children clapped and cheered as he handed Bryant the flowers and balloons he was carrying.  Bryant covered her face as tears ran down it.

  • Man serving life sentence for Quincy woman’s murder back in court

    Kevin Johnson, who pleaded guilty in 2012 for the 2010 murder of 92-year-old Eunice “Sunny” Lester, was back in Quincy before Judge Barbara Hobbs on Tuesday for an evidentiary hearing.
    Johnson, 33, pleaded guilty in 2012 to premeditated first-degree murder, carjacking without a weapon and aggravated battery with a deadly weapon causing great bodily harm to a person 65 years or older.

  • History marches back

    By Vickie Lillo

  • A growth industry in Sawdust

    Editor’s note: This is the first part of an ongoing, occasional series devoted to Gadsden County’s historic communities. This is the first story dedicated to the Sawdust

    It’s Thanksgiving week.  Many will be eating greens, peas and okra fresh from Brown and Son’s Farm to their table.
    Just as those foods are Thanksgiving staples, with recipes passed down from generation to generation, Brown and Son is a staple in the Sawdust community.

  • Sawdust sprouts around lumber mill in 19th century

    Have you ever driven down an old country road and seen a sign identifying a small community, and wondered how it got its name?  Maybe you have noticed an abandoned building or old store, and imagined what used  to be there.
    “SAWDUST.  Before there was a Miami (at least before it had a city charter), there was a Sawdust, Florida,” Kay Davis Lay wrote in 1988, “Scenes of Sawdust & Suburbs 18 Month Calendar-Cookbook.”
    Old postal records for the community date back to 1895.

  • Helping Midway’s homeless at Thanksgiving

    With the help of two local churches, friends and other organizations a Quincy woman fed those in need on Thanksgiving Day.
    Pat Smith said and she and her friend Addie Holt passed out 125 plates to homeless people this past Thursday.  She said their goal was to feed those who weren’t going out to the places serving food.
    “They still need Thanksgiving dinner,” Smith said.