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Local News

  • City seeks to recoup losses from failed businesses

    Just how much of a deposit will the county be required to pay to have utilities turned on when the hospital is finished in June? There was no definitive answer, but the Quincy City Commission is looking seriously at how to insure they get at least part of the money owed them when businesses file bankruptcy. When the hospital closed in November 2005, the city of Quincy was owed more than $100,000 in past-due bills.

  • Boyd honored with IFAS Hall of Fame award

    Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) has been presented with the Hall of Fame award by the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agriculture Science North Florida Research and Education Center for his 12 years of service to the advancement of science and agriculture in North Florida.

    The award was presented by NFREC Director, Dr. Nick Comerford, last week at the Quincy NFREC. Boyd was in Quincy for his forum on HAZMAT issues for local farmers.

  • Boy wakes, save family from fire

    April Williams is grateful to her 4-year-old son, Thomas Williams, for saving the family from what could have been a disaster Sunday night. A fire ignited in the wiring in the hood above the stove at the family’s home and began to burn. Williams said Thomas woke her and the family when he started running up and down the hall yelling for her to "Get up! The house is on fire!" Williams was able to extinguish the fire before the Quincy Fire Department arrived. The house, at 133 Pine Tree Lane in the Friendship Community, sustained minor damage to kitchen cabinets.

  • School board members question ‘green’ school proposal

    The Gadsden County School Board was presented with the idea of building a “green” school in Havana during its meeting last week – and the idea became a subject of debate amongst board members.

    A green school has a “significant portion of green and sustainable actual building materials and systems that incorporate high energy efficiency and water conservation measures.” This type of building will use 33 percent less energy, save 32 percent more water and reduce solid waste by 74 percent. On average, green schools save $100,000 per year.

  • Fire deemed ‘example’ of poor fire service

    A mobile home fire in Midway last Thursday morning was a "perfect example" of how an all-county volunteer fire department will not work, Quincy Fire Chief Howard Smith told the Quincy City Commission during a special workshop Thursday night.

    Smith said it took Quincy fire fighters about eight minutes to arrive at the mobile home, owned by Cassandra Moore, in the 200 block of Buckskin Circle. There were volunteer firefighters on the scene but no efforts had been made to contain the fire, he said.

  • Black History parade set for this weekend

    The 27th annual Black History Parade and Festival will be held Saturday in downtown Quincy.

    Parade organizer Anthony Powell said there won't be any changes from last year’s format. The parade, which features marching bands, floats, walking units and civic organizations, will begin at 11 a.m., with lineup at 10 a.m. at the corner of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and South Stewart Street.

    Any individual or groups that want to participate in the parade can preregister or register on site.The is no cost to participate in the parade.

  • Sheriff gets less than half of funds requested

    Gadsden County Sheriff Morris Young didn't get the $500,000 he asked for during a county commission workshop last week, but commissioners did vote to give him $200,000. The money will be used to help the sheriff meet some of the operating costs at the jail that he says have caused his law enforcement budget to fall short.

    "I've talked to the sheriff and he's fine with this. This is what we're doing and what we can afford. He knows the fiscal constraints this county is under," said Commission Chairman Eugene Lamb.

  • Local leaders await word on how much, if any, federal stimulus dollars will wind up in Gadsden County

    While county leadership awaits word on whether Gadsden County will receive any federal stimulus package funding and, if so, how much, governors throughout the country have expressed optimism that the package President Barack Obama has signed will provide some much-needed relief for states.

    State leaders are saying that the money will prevent further budget cuts and unemployment rate increases.

  • County honors its own

    Twelve-year county commissioner Sterling Watson, surrounded by his family, at top, was presented a plaque from Commission Chairman Eugene Lamb last Tuesday night during the regular meeting of the board. Former county commissioner Carolyn Roberson accepts a plaque expressing appreciation for her service as a member of the board. She was also joined by her family. Sammy Dowds was presented a Certificate of Appreciation and a clock for 35 years of service.

  • Local leaders meet, discuss upcoming anti-gang campaign

    "There was a time when, if you talked about gangs, you could pretty much bet that they were in the inner city. All of that has changed," said Tony Parker, a minister who has devoted his life to helping young people make the right choices.