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Local News

  • Funds to keep hospital up and running scarce

    The push to renovate and remodel the hospital is nearly complete, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. All that's needed now is to locate the nearly $2.7 million it will take to get the facility operational for at least 6 months. That doesn't include the furniture, fixtures and equipment at an estimated cost of $3.3 million.

  • Outstanding bills could break Urgent Care fund

    "You are basically out of money to run the Urgent Care (at Gadsden Community Hospital)," Gadsden County Clerk of Court Nicholas Thomas wrote in a memo to couny commissioners last week.

    In the memo, Thomas said there is only $145,897 left in the fund that operates the facility, and that might not be a true picture of the financial outlook because of outstanding bills, including insurance, utilities and computer services. Once those are paid, the fund could be broke.

  • Escapee tells officers: 'I give up. Please take me back to jail'

    A passing motorist on Highway 12 near Quincy Creek spotted a man coming from beneath the bridge late Monday night and called the Gadsden County Sheriff's Office. That tip, one of 60 investigators followed up on, led authorities to the apprehension of Roy Jones Jr., the 18-year-old man who had been the subject of a three-day manhunt.

    Jones escaped custody last Friday morning when he jumped out of a GCSO transport van between the courthouse and the county jail.

  • School board unanimously votes in favor of 'green' school in Havana

    “If educators don’t seize every opportunity to enrich the education of our children, who will?”

    The question was posed by Nell Cunningham, one of many Havana residents gathered to support the proposal for building a “green” school in Havana during last Tuesday night’s school board special meeting, during which the board unanimously voted in favor of the proposal.

    The proposal was first brought before the board during last month’s regular meeting, but board members felt more information was needed in order to make a decision.

  • County still has a ways to go to be ready for hurricane season

    Learning from past disasters and adjusting for the future was the lesson learned for local emergency management agencies.

    "We learned a lot from Tropical Storm Fay. What to do with all of the debris is a prime example of one of the lessons we learned," said Maj. Shawn Wood, director of Gadsden County Emergency Management Services Department.

  • County law enforcement to get slice of recovery pie

    President Barack Obama announced last week the release of $2 billion in Recovery Act 2009 funding allocations for state and local law enforcement assistance through the Edward Byrne Justice Assistance Grant Program – and Gadsden County will be getting a slice of the pie.

  • City commissioners question utility bills

    Quincy City Commission-er Derrick Elias wasn't in the mood to hear what he called "rhetoric” Tuesday night during the regular meeting of the city commission. Elias said something is wrong and that his own bill this month "threw him for a loop."

  • Chief hits streets to provide info on regulations

    Quincy Police Chief Ferman Richardson went door to door last Thursday morning in the Sunset Acres neighborhood to place door hangers and talk with residents about the stepped up implementation of the city of Quincy's animal nuisance ordinance. The bright, yellow hangers provided compliance information for homeowners.

    Donn James and his wife, Sue, were working in their yard on Wallace Drive when Richardson stopped to talk about the the door hanger. James said the number of stray dogs and cats has decreased recently and he thanked police officers for enforcing the ordinance.

  • Telecommunications system continues to operate in the red; commissioners debate status

    "I've been hearing this hype and hoopla for the past six years and nothing has changed," said Quincy City Commissioner Finley Cook about the city's telecommunications department during Tuesday night's regular commission meeting. A financial report showed that the city, which serves 338 customers, is losing about $5,000 per month.

    "We have a system is not working. We need a plan to stop spending the citizens’ money on telecommunications. We have to reduce the expenditures of this city," Cook said.

  • Community watch programs could have prevented burglaries

    Quincy Police Chief Ferman Richardson said last week a simple thing like a Neighborhood Crime Watch program could have prevented the recent burglary of two homes and the attempted burglary of another, The crimes, he said, occurred within minutes of each other.

    "The homeowner, on his way to work, saw someone who appeared to be trying to break into his neighbor's house but wasn't sure. Instead of calling us, he called an off-duty officer," Richardson said.