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Local News

  • Volunteer firefighters say they've got the better deal for the county

    Gadsden County fire chiefs presented county commissioners a proposal Tuesday night outlining how their volunteer fire departments could give the county equal or better fire protection than is in place currently.

  • Family struggled with grief as trial moved forward

    Constance Dupont was Bernard Hunter's little sister. He worried about her sometimes but was always confident that she could hold her own with anyone.

    "They had to steal her. One on one she could handle herself with man or woman. That's why her nickname was Bear," said her brother.

    But Dupont couldn't hold her own in the early morning hours of August 3, 2002. Someone shot her several times through the window of her apartment at 411 Main St., No. 23, in Havana.

  • Commissioners agree to provide $200,00 to sheriff's department

    Gadsden County Sheriff Morris Young didn't get the $500,000 he asked for during a county commission workshop last week, but commissioners voted Tuesday night during a regular meeting to give him $200,000. The money will be used to help the sheriff meet some of the operating costs at the jail that he says have caused his law enforcement budget to fall short.

    "I've talked to the sheriff and he's fine with this. This is what we're doing and what we can afford it. He knows the fiscal constraints this county is under," said Commission Chairman Eugene Lamb.

  • Stewart Street’s Harris named Rookie Teacher of the Year

    Kesandra Harris, Gadsden County Rookie Teacher of the Year 2009-10, thought teachers were underappreciated and overworked – and she had no desire to pursue a career in education.

    The James A. Shanks High School graduate was pursuing a degree at Florida State University, majoring in psychology, with a minor in special education.

    “I had said I would never be a teacher, due to political issues,” she laughed. “But I became a teacher because I found myself in it, not because it was my last resort as a job.”

  • Event designed to help residents save money

    Want to get information that will help you with your financial problems? Come to AmericaSAVES/GadsdenSAVES Countywide Financial Conference Feb 26 at the University of Florida Research Center from 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Program speakers will cover such topics as, "What To Do If You Cannot Pay Your Utilities Bills," "Where To Go To Find Training To Help You Learn A Trade Or Seek Work" and "Learning How to Save for Emergencies."

  • Daughters on opposite sides face heartache during sentencing hearing

    Updated 1:15 p.m.

    Leon Circuit Judge Kathleen Dekker handed down a life sentence today for Hernandez Lopaz Daniels, convicted Tuesday of killing Constance Dupont, a Havana resident and former law enforcement informant. The sentence was recommended by the jury after an hour-long deliberation.

    Updated 9:30 a.m.

    Two daughters made tearful pleas for their parents Thursday as part of their testimony during the sentencing hearing for Hernandez Lopaz Daniels, who is facing a possible death penalty or life in prison.

  • Teacher of the Year says she’s found her niche in education

    LaTonya Rollinson took the scenic route to becoming an educator, but she is sure she has found her niche.

    Recently named the Gadsden County Teacher of the Year 2009-10, Rollinson has worked in the Gadsden County Clerk’s Office, for the city of Quincy and in the juvenile court, a job for which she said she had a lot of passion.

    But after being given the opportunity to work at Crossroad Academy, Rollinson, who has taught at Havana Elementary School for six years, knew she’d found her true calling.

  • City up on utilities after more than a decade of delinquency

    After more than 10 years of delinquent payments to Quincy utility provider Progress Energy, the city is current, according to City Manager Jack McLean. For the past two years the city has been as much as 120 to 150 days behind.

    "I am proud to say that we have caught up, but it has been a cooperative effort. We did not rob Peter to pay Paul, but we tackled it inch by inch," McLean said. Theresa Moore, finance director, has done an outstanding job helping to manage the cash flow, McLean added.

  • Homeowners warned: Look out for meter reader safety

    Ann Sherman, city of Quincy customer service director, says that meter readers face danger each time they attempt to read meters at some homes. During a Jan. 8 meeting with meter readers, Sherman learned obstacles created by homeowners are slowing up accuracy and "interfere with the performance of their (readers) duties."

    In addition to trying to read through glass that has become opaque with age, readers have been chased by vicious dogs and have been reduced to crawling through and under overgrown shrubbery to gain access to meters.

  • Major peanut butter jar brands not affected by recall

    On behalf of Florida’s peanut farmers, the Florida Farm Bureau Federation reminds consumers that the peanut butter/peanut butter paste recall does not apply to most major brands of jar peanut butter. The recall applies to a limited amount of food products containing peanut butter or peanut butter paste.