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Local News

  • Vet report shows mare was victim of neglect

    The final veterinary report on “Horse A,” the mare abandoned at the Gadsden County Animal Shelter, has been submitted to Johnny Williams, Gadsden County administrator, who said the results are unsettling.

    "The final results are that there is no disease that could have caused what happened to the animal. It has been determined that it is a case of neglect and possibly cruelty to animals," Williams said after receiving the report.

  • Swine flu shots are here

    The Gadsden County Health Department has received H1N1 in the mist (intranasal) and injection  for 2009 and currently has 700 doses.

    The health department will offer the vaccine free of charge to those in the first priority group (see below) at walk-in clinic at 278 LaSalle Leffall Drive in Quincy Oct. 24-25 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    The live intranasal vaccine is approved for use in healthy (no high risk medical conditions), non-pregnant persons ages 2 through 49 and at this time will only be offered to those in the first priority group.

  • Horse put down after condition worsens

    “Horse A,” also known as “Hope,” was euthanized Oct. 21 at 5 p.m.

  • Family in shock following verdict in Harris trial

    It took a Gadsden County jury about 3 hours to find Dearendo Laqwan Harris not guilty on first-degree murder, arson and robbery in the Feb. 7, 2008 death of Dekendric Rikale Smith. Circuit Court Judge Kathleen Dekker read the verdict Oct. 20.

    Smith's burned body was found on the back seat floor board after a passerby noticed the 1996 Chevrolet Caprice burning near the entrance of the Hammock Creek Industrial Park, just off U.S. Highway 90 east.

    But jurors were not convinced that Harris strangled Smith to death before torching his car on River Birch Road.

  • Chattahoochee officer kills self; body found behind his house confirmed that of missing woman

    A relationship that was sometimes volatile, according to the Gadsden County Sheriff's Office, ended Oct. 23 when the body of 34-year-old Antoinette Ross was located in a shallow grave behind the home  of Lt. Barry Moore of the Chattahoochee Police Department in the Mt. Pleasant Community, west of Quincy.

    Earlier in the day, as deputies searched his property, Moore shot himself in the chest in the front yard of his home. He died at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital shortly after he was taken there by Life Flight.

  • Investigators say murder case is ongoing

    Lt. Jim Corder of the Gadsden County Sheriff's Office said the investigation into the death of Antoinette Ross is ongoing and there is reason to believe that Barry Moore, the Chattahoochee police officer who had been dating Ross, had help disposing of Ross' body after he apparently shot her in the chest with a .45 caliber handgun.

    "We feel that there was someone who helped him after the fact. We want the public to know that this is not over," Corder said.

  • Streets to be closed during Night of Harvest

    Several Quincy streets will be closed Oct. 31 as the city of Quincy and Liberty Outreach Ministries host the third annual Night of Harvest celebration from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

    The street closures include Graves Street from Washington to King streets, Washington Street from Graves Street to 14th Street (Pat Thomas Parkway) and Main Street from Jefferson Street to Washington Street (just north of Lindy's Fried Chicken).

    Residents who live in the affected areas will be notified of the street closures, times and date.

  • New dental clinic to open in Chattahoochee

    West Gadsden County residents will soon have more access to dental services.  The Gadsden County Health Department is opening a new dental clinic in Chattahoochee.

    The facility, located at 680 Maple St., is equipped with four full-service dental treatment rooms and has space to expand.  The primary focus of the clinic is to provide Medicaid-eligible children with comprehensive dental services, but some limited services will be available to adults.

  • Quincy city officials look at safety issue at Crossroad Academy

    During a recent meeting of the Quincy city commission, Commissioner Derrick Elias expressed concerns about safety of students at Crossroad Academy, a charter school which recently relocated on Strong Road. He cited the lack of speed reduction signs and no street striping to indicate a school as two areas of concern.

    Ideally, he said, sidewalks should be on Strong Road for the safety of students walking to school. And, he further noted, many children who live across the street at Omega Villas and attend the school are at risk when crossing the street.

  • Commissioners take hard look at how vendors make city appear

    Quincy city commissioners will hold a special workshop Oct. 27 at 4:30 p.m. to take a close look at the proposed ordinance that would impose special restrictions on food vendors along city streets.

    Larry White, city attorney, showed commissioners pictures of various sites where food vendors have set up. Some have been in business and would be in violation of the ordinance if approved. While some of the vendors have been in the same place for months, others pop up overnight in different locations.