Local News

  • Update: Fugitive captured in Tampa

       Bradley Bruce, the 38-year-old fugerative, who has been on the run since Feb. 11, was captured in a Tampa motel room on Feb 28.
        Major Shawn Wood of the Gadsden County Sheriff's Office said the case had been turned over to the U.S. Marshal's office which had been tracking his movements since he fled Gadsden County.

  • Quincy selects new police chief

    Walter McNeil has been chosen as the next police chief for the city of Quincy, effective Feb. 28, 2011. 

  • Slaying suspect surrenders to police chief

    The man accused of killing 42-year-old Otis Bernard Harley on Jan. 30 voluntarily turned himself in at the Gadsden County Jail early Friday morning, Feb. 4. James McGriff, 32, accompanied by his attorney Henry Hunter, walked into the jail with McGriff around 1:30 a.m. and surrendered.
        Quincy Police Chief Gerald McSwain said he got a call around 9:30 Thursday night from one of McGriff's childhood friends who said he wanted to meet.

  • Judge visits Carter-Parramore Academy

    It was not hard to tell that Carter-Parramore Academy was a special place to Judge Kathy Garner.
    The circuit court judge had slipped out of courtroom to address an assembly at the school she once attended.
    Last Friday was the school's Academic Assembly and National Literacy Week Celebration, a mid-year event which recognized the achievements of both students and employees.

  • Crime spree hits Gadsden County

    On Jan. 13 the price of gold was $1,365 per ounce. Less than a week later it had jumped to $1,405.06 per ounce. And as the price of gold increases there seems to be a direct correlation to the rise in break-ins around the county where the items most taken are gold.
        Hardly a week has gone by when someone has not been the victim of a break-in since September. There have been so many break-ins in the eastern part of Gadsden County in the past few weeks that authorities are calling it a crime spree.

  • Midway shuffle: Mayor out; city manager back

       There has been a shake up in Midway city government. It all happened during the regular Jan.6 meeting of the council. After more than six hours when the meeting stopped, to continue on Jan. 11, Mayor Quintealia Cato and been replaced by Mayor Pro Tem Charles "Chuck" Willis, Councilwoman Ella Barber was named Mayor Pro Tem. Agatha Muse-Salters, who was terminated as city manager in September 2010, was reappointed and interim city manager, Roosevelt Morris, went back to his post as director of growth management.

  • Gaming complex launched in Gretna

        Helen Franks said Tuesday afternoon that she was so happy she could hardly contain her enthusiam. The Gretna mayor was speaking to a group of about 100 people who huddled in the cold for the groundbreaking ceremony for the Creek Entertainment facility at Gretna.
        "This is a new day for Gretna. This means job growth and economic growth," she said.

  • Crash claims life of popular teen

        By all accounts 18-year-old De'Erick McCray could light up a room with his presence. On Jan. 5 at approximately 6:20 p.m. that light was snuffed out when McCray was killed instantly in a traffic accident on High Bridge Road a few miles south of the Quincy city limits.

  • Mother and son die in mobile home fire

     An early morning mobile home fire claimed the lives of 39-year-old Francisca Calderon and her 10-year-old son, Ervan Calderon, Tuesday. Quincy Fire Department responded to a call at 1:52 a.m. regarding a structure fire. When they arrived the structure was fully engulfed, according to a report released by the Quincy Fire Department.
        Both victims were found inside the home once the fire was extinguished. Francisca Calderon was found in the north bedroom and Ervan, a student at George W. Munroe Elementary School, was found in the south bedroom.

  • 2nd chance education at district's academy

    There is nothing ordinary about Carter-Parramore Academy,
    It is housed on a campus with historic significance to many area residents.
    It serves a diverse body of 270 students -- each there for a special reason.
    And it fills an educational niche that provides learning, personal responsibility and a tangible awareness that its students will one day be out on their own.
    Each of the 20 teachers there has to make a difference and the staff completes a supportive environment.