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Local News

  • Midway names interim police chief in special meeting

    Midway, during a special meeting March 20, appointed Capt. Jerome Turner as interim police chief. Turner has been running the operations arm of the department since Chief Terron Lindsey was placed on administrative leave with pay earlier this year.

    Lindsey was arrested in December 2012 after the Florida Department of Law Enforcement charged him with official misconduct and petit theft.

  • Speculation surrounds Internet cafe

    The lights are on at 1954 Pat Thomas Parkway, but no one seems to be at home.

    In recent weeks, the parking lot in front of the Quincy Business Center was filled with vehicles and a uniformed security stood watch at the door.

    There has been local speculation that the Business Center might have been one of about 50 Internet parlors shut down March 14 associated with an investigation into Allied Veterans of the World and the organization’s association with the cafés.

  • In-school suspension
  • County, state team up for trio of arrests

    Search warrants executed by the Gadsden County Special Operations Unit and the Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in Havana on March 14 yielded three arrests.

    Harry Wilcoxson, 71, was arrested without incident at his home on Walters Street around 7:30 a.m. He has been charged with possession of cocaine with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a store (274 feet) and a daycare (100 yards) school, possession of drug equipment, possession of a weapon by a convicted felon and possession of ammunition by a convicted felon.

  • Ex-firefighter convicted for molestation

    Former Midway assistant fire chief Charles David Owens, 41, and his girlfriend, 37-year-old Jennifer Bay, were convicted recently on child molestation charges in a Gadsden County court. Bay was not a firefighter but was a member of the fire department’s auxiliary and sometimes spokesperson for the department.

  • Day for champions

    More than 800 athletes, volunteers and family members attended the Summer Special Olympics Games on March 7 at East Gadsden High School’s track field. Ranging in age from 8 to 18, the athletes participated in running, jumping and throwing events, trying to earn a spot on the local team, which will compete this summer at the statewide games in Orlando.

  • Two arrested on drug charges

    Two Quincy men were arrested March 8 and charged with possession of marijuana with intent to sell. After a search of both men, officers found one large bag containing approximately 1 pound of marijuana, eight small bags of marijuana, two small bags of methamphetamine, a small bag of cocaine, two test kits and $572.31 in currency between the two men.
    Arrested were Cornelius Wooden, 26, of 1105 Joe Adams Road and Terrall Smith, 27, of 460 Carter Road.

  • Quincy shuttle service to resume April 1

    The Quincy Shuttle, operated by Big Bend Transit, is back in business until the end of this fiscal year. The in-town shuttle ceased operating on Feb. 28 because the emergency funding from the city of Quincy and Gadsden County had dried up. But the two governments have given the company a bailout.

    During its March 5 regular meeting, the Gadsden County Board of Commissioners voted to subsidize Big Bend Transit with $36,000 to continue through the fiscal year ending Sept. 30. However, that was contingent on the actions the city of Quincy would take at its March 12 meeting.

  • Quincy says farewell to fire chief

    “I’m just ready. Mentally, I feel it is right. I’m not upset with anyone, and my last two years with the department have been extremely positive,” said retiring Quincy Fire Chief Howard “Bubba” Smith. He was talking about his retirement, after 32 years, with the city of Quincy as a public safety officer and a firefighter.
    Smith’s first job with the city really began as a teenager when he was a lifeguard at the Jackson Heights pool.

  • Marching on

    The Black History Parade and Festival celebration were rained out Feb. 23, but organizers were determined to have the parade March 2. Braving the cold morning, which brought with it lots of sunshine but a wind chill factor in the mid-30s, parade participants bundled up from head to toe.

    “This is a good turnout because a lot of people who had planned to participate last week could not come back, but some were nice enough to try again. This is the 32 year for the parade,” said organizer Anthony Powell.