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Local News

  • Ribbed at roast

    Laughs were in no short supply at the Roast and Toast of Superintendent Reginald James on June 14 as one speaker after another delivered monologues about the superintendent’s finest achievements and idiosyncratic quirks. The event at East Gadsden High School was designed to honor the school official through comedy and anecdotes shared by some of those closest to him. 

  • Neighborhood watch working for Scottstown

    The Scottstown Community held its regular neighborhood watch meeting June 10 at the Pentecostal Church on Charlie Harris Loop. The Scottstown watch is part of a pilot program launched by the Gadsden County Sherriff’s office. 

    Jolene Williams, GCSO’s crime analyst, was trained at the attorney general’s office specifically to be part of the budding program. She said the community was selected as the location for the pilot program because it had a high rate of crime and high frequency of complaints. 

  • Quincy leaders look at logging, busing

    Saving money and making money were on the minds of Quincy commissioners at the regular June 10 meeting.

    Members of the commissioners discussed a continuation of their expired contract with the Whitfield Timber Company for the harvesting of trees in the city’s industrial park. The city and the company signed the initial agreement during October 2013. 

  • Former Quincy city manager files lawsuit

    Jack McLean, former Quincy city manager, is suing his former employer for his severance pay, his leave-time pay and his retirement pay. McLean’s case documents allege the city is unlawfully withholding all three sums, including the retirement, which the former manager’s case contends he paid into during his tenure with the city. 

  • Adventures in agriculture

    Florida A&M University’s Cooperative Extension Program hosted the annual Farm Fest and Springtime Agri-Showcase on June 7 at the FAMU research and Extension Center on Bainbridge Highway in Quincy. 

    The event began at 7 a.m. with a 2K walk/run — but activities and exhibitions commenced around 9 a.m. The event included displays concerning crop growth, food processes, climate changes, new technology and more. 

  • County planning rule sparks debate

    The Gadsden County Commissioners met for a regular meeting June 3. Extensive discussion of the Citizen’s Growth Management and Planning Bill of Rights ensued. 

    Commissioner Sherrie Taylor said she initially voted for the bill because citizens should be kept informed about the possibility of commercial developments in their neighborhoods before the businesses break ground. Taylor also said, at the time, three commissioners were running the county via the power of their three-vote majority. 

  • Midway city manager reports budget back on track

    Willie Brown from the Gadsden County Planning Department attended Midway’s monthly city council meeting June 5 to provide a second reading of an annexation document for property owned by Greg Russell. 

    Councilmember Charlie “Chuck” Willis asked for what the annexed property will be used. 

    “The business is already there,” said Brown. “The Greg Russell property is known as the Auction House.”

  • Store raids yield arrests

    The Kelly Jr. on Havana Highway and The Country Store on Bainbridge Highway, two alleged outlets for synthetic marijuana or “spice” and “bath salts,” were raided by agents from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (BATF) along with deputies from the Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office. 

  • Montford speaks at Go Gadsden

    Democratic State Sen. Bill Montford spoke at the Gadsden County Chamber of Commerce’s May 28 Go Gadsden meeting. Montford represents District 3, which includes all of Gadsden and 10 neighboring counties. Montford reviewed recent state developments and future possibilities — pending successful navigation through the state house and over the governor’s desk. 

  • Honoring memories

    Mt. Pleasant cemetery was busy with activity Saturday — but no funeral was in sight. As the night’s dew began to burn away with the arrival of a clear day, a group of volunteers from the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery Association was beginning their semiannual cleanup of the grounds.

    “There are people from all over the county buried here,” said Robert Alcorn of the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery Society. “You can literally see the history of Gadsden County if you walk around.”