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Local News

  • Honoring memories

    Mt. Pleasant cemetery was busy with activity Saturday — but no funeral was in sight. As the night’s dew began to burn away with the arrival of a clear day, a group of volunteers from the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery Association was beginning their semiannual cleanup of the grounds.

    “There are people from all over the county buried here,” said Robert Alcorn of the Mt. Pleasant Cemetery Society. “You can literally see the history of Gadsden County if you walk around.”

  • Quincy leaders talk tourism, traffic

    At the city’s regular meeting May 27, Maj. Shawn Wood from the Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office provided the commissioners with a special presentation about the Rural County Summit on community disaster and emergency response. The event is scheduled for July 9 to 11 at the Florida Public Safety Institute. 

  • Speaker hopes to spark business interest in youth

    James “Jay” Bailey, Atlanta CEO of Operation HOPE, provided a presentation about fostering entrepreneurship and a new generation of business owners among Gadsden’s youth. 

    The presentation was organized by Judge Kathy Garner and hosted May 28 at the Gadsden Arts Center. Community leaders from a wide range of local organizations attended, filling the hall to standing room only. 

  • June 6, 1944: Remembering D-Day

    Editor’s note: Permission to distribute and re-publish Ernie Pyle’s columns was given by the Scripps Howard Foundation. 

    NORMANDY BEACHHEAD, June 12, 1944 — Due to a last-minute alteration in the arrangements, I didn’t arrive on the beachhead until the morning after D-day, after our first wave of assault troops had hit the shore.

  • June 6, 1944: Remembering D-Day

    Ernie Pyle understood invasions, from the initial landing to the ultimate occupation. Before D-Day, the war correspondent had documented the process more than once. And he understood the steepest cost of invasions: not just death — but the irrevocable attachment of a life to a particular time and place. 

  • June 6, 1944: Remembering D-Day

    Ernie Pyle

    Reprinted with permission of Scripps Howard Foundation

    NORMANDY BEACHHEAD, June 16, 1944 – I took a walk along the historic coast of Normandy in the country of France.

    It was a lovely day for strolling along the seashore. Men were sleeping on the sand, some of them sleeping forever. Men were floating in the water, but they didn’t know they were in the water, for they were dead.

  • June 6, 1944: Remembering D-Day

    Ernie Pyle

    NORMANDY BEACHHEAD, June 17, 1944 – In the preceding column we told about the D-day wreckage among our machines of war that were expended in taking one of the Normandy beaches.

    But there is another and more human litter. It extends in a thin little line, just like a high-water mark, for miles along the beach. This is the strewn personal gear, gear that will never be needed again, of those who fought and died to give us our entrance into Europe.

  • June 6, 1944: Remembering D-Day

     Informationon the Ernie Pyle World War II Museum

    The Ernie Pyle World War II Museum features the famous journalist’s birthplace and a museum dedicated to Pyle’s life and writings as a war correspondent. It is owned by the Friends of Ernie Pyle, who are dedicated to preserving and expanding the legacy of the writer whose columns linked the soldiers on the front line to worried families on the home front. To preserve Ernie Pyle’s memory is to preserve the sacrifices made by what has been dubbed “The Greatest Generation.”

  • June 6, 1944: Remembering D-Day

     Editors note: the ensuing account about an NCO’s experience in the an airborne outfit during WWII—includingthe headline, prefatory remarks, and punctuation—isreproduced exactly as it appeared in the May 31, 1945, issue of The Gadsden County Times.

    Former Chattahoochee boy—paratrooper tells of experience.

    The following is the story of Sgt. Herbert Lanier, formerly of Chattahoochee, now of Texas City, Texas. He is the cousin of Mrs. Nell Faulkner, of Chattahoochee.


  • School earns statewide status

    Stewart Street Elementary School in Quincy received FCAT 2 scores on May 23. They discovered their third-graders ranked second in the state in both reading and math. This is a marked improvement from last year’s scores. 

    Maya Rozier, a third-grade teacher, explained that the improved math scores were reached by making sure the students used and understood problem-solving strategies — and wrote out their work to demonstrate their progress and command of the concepts.