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Local News

  • Midway votes to reign in citizen comment

    During the Midway City Council meeting on Jan. 4, council members voted 3-2 to no longer allow citizens to speak on items not on the agenda.
    On the agenda, there was a section that read, “Public comments to be heard on agenda items only (3 Minute limit).”  At previous council meetings, there was a time allotted for any public comments.
    Councilman Ronald Colston said he thinks the public should be able to discuss whatever they want during the comments.

  • Finally ready to retire

    Stanley Burns said he’s just an old man who’s been working a long time.  The 91-year-old Quincy native retired for the second time last month.
    After spending two years in the navy, Burns came back to his hometown in 1946.
    “I went in the navy in 1944, and I said if I ever get back to Gadsden County I’ll stay there.

  • County commissioners to consider live streaming meetings — again

    Gadsden County Commissioners recently stopped airing their meetings live on Facebook, causing some citizens to question why.
    Interim County Administrator Dee Jackson said they stopped live-streaming the meetings because some of the commissioners had complained about it.  She also said since commissioners never voted to live-stream the meetings, they didn’t have to vote on the issue to stop.
    Since the county stopped airing the meetings on Facebook in November, Commissioner Gene Morgan has asked for an on the subject update at every meeting.

  • 2017 in review: Violent crime
  • Seasonal business a Gadsden County tradition in holiday snacking

    Davunda Watkins
    Special to the Times

  • Along Twin Ponds Road

    “Brah! Braah! Wah! Whaa!, A’rau-ow!”
    “Thank, God,” the unsettling, early morning silence had been broken by a wonderful flock of Canadian geese flying overhead.
    The sound of the geese was the first I had heard upon arising from my usual 5 a.m., except for the harsh ringing in my ears that had awakened me in a near panic earlier, at 2:34 a.m., when I thought an alarm was going off in the house.
    The dog was also calling me to let him out of his cage and into our warm bed.

  • WINDINGROADS

    Byron Spires
    Times columnist

  • Havana man surrenders after brief standoff

    On Thursday, Dec. 28, around 8 a.m., Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office responded to a mobile home on Treebark Court in Havana. According to a GCSO press release, the wife of John Clayton Partin had reported to law enforcement that he was distraught and suicidal.
    Deputies attempted to make contact with the man. His wife told them there were weapons in the home, and he had barricaded himself inside. The Leon County Sheriff’s Office and their SWAT and Hostage Negotiations assisted GCSO.

  • New year off to a greens start

    When it comes to New Year’s traditional foods and why people eat them at the start of each year — greens are for the money.  So this past Saturday many people were out buying freshly picked turnips and collards for their New Year’s dinner.
    Greens, black-eyed peas and pork are a well-known southern New Year’s tradition.  According to old stories passed down through generations, the leafy greens, whether turnips, collards, or mustards, represent wealth and prosperity in the new year.

  • 2017 in pictures