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Local News

  • ‘Copper bandit’ suspects nabbed

    Authorities believe they have the “copper bandits” behind bars.

    Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office investigators arrested three suspects Sept. 17 on charges stemming from a rash of reported copper thefts resulting in tens of thousands of dollars in damages in recent months to local schools and businesses targeted in the crimes.

  • Facing a challenge

    Some people see an organization’s crisis as something from which to flee. Not Dorothy Inman-Johnson. Hearing about the city of Midway’s turmoil and the city manager’s resignation made her want to roll up her sleeves and start solving problems.

  • Quincy CRA submits director resignation

    Quincy commissioners had a special meeting for the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency on Sept. 18 to discuss the Sept. 9 resignation of CRA Director Charles Hayes.

    In the letter, Hayes gave a 45-day notice, but city commissioners voted to end his employment with the city on Oct. 8, the minimum allowed in his employment contract, according to the city attorney.

  • Murder suspect arrested

    A Gadsden County murder suspect is in custody thanks to a Tallahassee tipster.

    The North Florida U.S. Marshal Fugitive Task Force arrested Willie Gene Westberry III, 25, on Sept. 18 in connection with an April 27 homicide outside a club in Chattahoochee.

    Capt. Jim Corder, Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office spokesman, said Westberry was arrested on a homicide charge in the death of Sterling S. Johnson,  28.

  • Shuttered printing house to get new use

    A businessman with big plans for the long-shuttered home of The Printing House cleared a major hurdle at the Sept. 3 meeting of The Gadsden County Commission.

    Jose Pons and other supporters described plans to put a new industry in the vacant building as a sign of budding economic activity.

    Commissioner Sherrie Taylor, who represents District 5 where the facility is located, described it as a weed.

  • They’re playing like Jags

    TERRANCE CHISOLM

    Times Sports Correspondent

    This past Friday East Gadsden hosted the Rutherford Rams of Panama City. The Rams put up the first points of the game with 9:45 left to play in the first quarter, as their quarterback hit a receiver sprinting down the left sideline. After the Rams went up 7-0, the Jaguars lost two fumbles the Rams converted into points, and with 4:42 left in the opening quarter, East Gadsden players found themselves behind by a score of 21-0. 

  • New interim city manager, mayor for Midway

    Midway council members voted unanimously to hire a new interim executive director at the regular city council meeting Thursday, Sept. 5.

    Council members hired Dorothy Inman-Johnson.

    Mayor Jerrod Holton resigned as mayor and from the council at the meeting. Angelia Goldwire, Midway finance and administration, said the resignation was expected.

    “In the last meeting he stated that he would do that, and he did,” she said. 

  • Labor Day Jam rocks Quincy

    For many years, Labor Day in Quincy was a quiet holiday for summer barbecues and other low-key gatherings.

    This Labor Day that tradition of quiet was replaced by the sound of music that started Saturday with Porchfest and continued through the long weekend ending Monday with a performance by R&B singer and American Idol Season 3 winner Fantasia, who brought members of the crowd at Tanyard Creek Park to their seat — and moved some to stand on those seats to get a better view of her high-energy show.

  • Porch perfect harmony

    Despite the heat, Porchfest drew music enthusiasts to Quincy’s historic district to wander the streets and listen to about 14 acts deliver a number of styles —including Chris Jobinski covering AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell,” The Benders delivering their rendition of a Coldplay hit and Thursday Night Music Club bringing the big band standard “Take the ‘A’ Train” to a front yard on Duval Street. Duke Ellington would have been proud.

  • Scotttown neighborhood watching

    Rewind 20 years ago when an area known affectionately as Scottown was a close-knit community of mostly relatives or people who had homesteaded there for 50 years or more. Young men brought their brides home to live in the area among longtime friends. It was a nice rural place to live.