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Local News

  • Local police say no more stray, nuisance animals

    Quincy's Police Chief Ferman Richardson and Corey Wilhoit, code enforcement officer, took to the streets Monday and Tuesday. They went door to door in the Sunset Acres neighborhood informing citizens that pets without tags or leashes and roaming city streets will not be tolerated.

    "Through our community policing efforts we received many complaints from people, especially in that area, about animals. We've gotten complaints about stray dogs and cats, some roaming the neighborhood and some coming out of the woods," Richardson said.

  • Sheriff tells county commissioners: Put up or shut up

    Gadsden County Sheriff Morris Young didn't pull any punches Tuesday night during the first meeting of 2009 with the county’s commissioners. The sheriff's budget was cut by a half-million dollars this year and Young said he cannot operate his department without that money.

    Commissioners voted to hold a Feb. 10 workshop to revisit the budget and find the money to put back into the sheriff's budget.

  • Local woman receives plaque for doing what many won’t –helping someone in crisis

    Velma Brown did something not many people do these days – when she spotted trouble she got involved.

    To show his appreciation, Quincy Police Chief Ferman Richardson invited her to a meeting of the Quincy City Commission and presented her with a plaque.

    Brown was driving down Lillian Springs Road around 7 p.m. Jan. 6 when she noticed a small child walking behind a woman who was walking very fast, and a man following her walking equally as fast. Neither of the adults, she said, seemed to notice that the child was following them.

  • Legislators focus on saving jobs for state workers, seek gambling funds

    In light of the $2.4 billion shortfall state officials are currently grappling with, Gadsden County’s Legislative delegation, Sen. Al Lawson and representatives Marti Coley and Alan Williams all agree that saving jobs for state workers is a priority.

    Nearly one-fourth of the county's work force is employed by the state of Florida.

  • Man questioned on one robbery, admits to another

    Back in mid-August, Howard Marshall, 50, was a busy man. According to the Quincy Police Department, he was busy burglarizing local businesses.

    Howard's deeds on Aug. 20 and 23 have caught up with him thanks to DNA and modern technology. According to a report on file with the Quincy Police Department, officers were called to Captain D's Restaurant in reference to a burglary on Aug. 20.

  • Midway Flying J files for bankruptcy, set to reorganize

    A businesses continue to suffer, the problems that started on Wall Street have hit Main Street USA.

    Last week, Flying J Inc. filed for bankruptcy protection, citing the sharp decline in oil prices and turmoil in the credit markets for its financial problems.

    The Flying J Truck Stop in Midway is owned and operated by the company.

  • Schrenker to face Florida charges

    When Indiana businessman Marcus Schrenker is released, he will likely face charges in Tallahassee or Pensacola, says Assistant Chief Deputy Frank Chiumento of the U.S. Marshals Northern District of Florida.

    Schrenker, who was found Tuesday night at a Chattahoochee KOA after an apparent suicide attempt, is wanted in Indiana in connection with a fraud investigation involving millions of dollars, Chiumento said. Schrenker was charged in a Florida court Wednesday with making a false distress call to the Federal Aviation Administration.

  • It will be warmer, but hard freeze still predicted for area

    The National Weather Service in Tallahassee issued a hard freeze warning for a portion of South Georgia and North Florida this morning, predicting near-record lows of 18-21 degrees in Tallahassee and the surrounding areas.

    But organizers of tonight's Jazz on the Square in Quincy saw the predictions and acted quickly, determining earlier this week that the event should be moved indoors. It will be held on the second floor of the Gadsden Arts Center, rather than on the Courthouse Square. Admission is still free, and the event is from 7 to 9 p.m.

  • State gets failing grade for emergency services

    Report cards are in for Florida’s emergency care system, and it looks like the state might need to go to bed without its supper.

    The state received an F and ranked 50th in the nation for its population’s lack of access to emergency care, according to the National Report Card on the State of Emergency Medicine, issued by the American College of Emergency Physicians earlier this month. Also contributing to the low ranking was the large population of uninsured Florida residents, few psychiatric beds and a low number of physicians who will accept Medicare.

  • Concert to ‘pump up’ downtown

    In an effort to pump some life into downtown, Quincy Main Street will host the first in a series of six concerts on the Courthouse Square Jan. 16 from 7 to 9 p.m.

    The Fusion Band, a Jacksonville-based variety band that specializes in jazz, rhythm and blues and featuring Allana Southerland, is synonymous with saxophonists Kirk Walhun, Gerald Albright and Najee. While the band provides free entertainment, visitors will get the chance to buy award-winning chili, barbecue and other foods. Shops will have extended hours that evening.