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Local News

  • It will be warmer, but hard freeze still predicted for area

    The National Weather Service in Tallahassee issued a hard freeze warning for a portion of South Georgia and North Florida this morning, predicting near-record lows of 18-21 degrees in Tallahassee and the surrounding areas.

    But organizers of tonight's Jazz on the Square in Quincy saw the predictions and acted quickly, determining earlier this week that the event should be moved indoors. It will be held on the second floor of the Gadsden Arts Center, rather than on the Courthouse Square. Admission is still free, and the event is from 7 to 9 p.m.

  • State gets failing grade for emergency services

    Report cards are in for Florida’s emergency care system, and it looks like the state might need to go to bed without its supper.

    The state received an F and ranked 50th in the nation for its population’s lack of access to emergency care, according to the National Report Card on the State of Emergency Medicine, issued by the American College of Emergency Physicians earlier this month. Also contributing to the low ranking was the large population of uninsured Florida residents, few psychiatric beds and a low number of physicians who will accept Medicare.

  • Concert to ‘pump up’ downtown

    In an effort to pump some life into downtown, Quincy Main Street will host the first in a series of six concerts on the Courthouse Square Jan. 16 from 7 to 9 p.m.

    The Fusion Band, a Jacksonville-based variety band that specializes in jazz, rhythm and blues and featuring Allana Southerland, is synonymous with saxophonists Kirk Walhun, Gerald Albright and Najee. While the band provides free entertainment, visitors will get the chance to buy award-winning chili, barbecue and other foods. Shops will have extended hours that evening.

  • County to hold growth meetings

    If you want to have a say in how and where the county is going to grow, plan to attend one of six meetings sponsored by the county's growth management department over the next four weeks. These meetings are designed to help residents decide what they want the county to look like in the future and how they want their own properties to look.

    “It's important that we get as much public participation as we can. Through these meetings we will develop a (growth) plan for Gadsden County," said Howard Douglas, county growth management director.

  • Local business owners pay up

    Quincy city officials are happy that more commercial accounts are paying their utility bills. Following an article published two weeks ago naming commercial accounts that were collectively more than $50,000 behind in payments, collections on commercial accounts are up.

  • Restaurant robbed, bandits still on the loose

    Quincy police are looking for two men who robbed the night manager of Captain D's restaurant at gunpoint and took an undisclosed amount of money late on Dec. 22.

    According to Investigator Clarence Pearson of the Quincy Police Department, two men, dressed in black from head to toe, waited outside the restaurant. When the manager and two other employees walked outside at 10:45 p.m., one of the men pointed the gun at the manager and ordered him to give him the pouch containing the night deposit.

  • BOCC sets legislative wish list

    When Gadsden County commissioners met in late December, they worked to prioritize the county’s needs, and an extension of the current license for the Gadsden Community Hospital was at the top of the list.

    Commissioners are asking Gov. Charlie Crist and the state legislature to take the necessary steps to get the extension to allow the county to successfully meet all of the requirements necessary to reopen and maintain the hospital.

  • G*STARS to lose money to seniors

    The Gadsden County Board of Commissioners voted Monday night during a special meeting to take $60,000 from G*STARS, a summer youth employment program, to bail out the Senior Citizens Center. The program will still have $15,000 left to use for the program, which is administered by Tallahassee Community College.

  • Quincy city leaders bring ‘hot topic’ to the table to discuss with county

    Quincy city commissioners want to sit down and talk with the Gadsden County Board of Commissioners about a hot issue: fire.

    The issue of fire protection for the county and the agreement it has with the city of Quincy is a little off kilter, according to some commissioners. The majority of the calls for fire service are outside the city limits and some, about 5 percent, are outside of the 5-mile service area.

    Commissioners Keith Dowdell and Finley Cook agreed that the county should be paying more than the $435,000 they currently pay annually.

  • City to cut delinquent businesses off ASAP

    Quincy city manager Jack McLean said delinquent business accounts are costing the city dollars it needs to meet its obligations. McLean decided recently that he needed to get the attention of businesses that have past due accounts.

    "When our residential customers don't pay their utility bills we have to interrupt their service. Unfortunately, we're going to have to do the same thing with some of our business accounts," McLean said.