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Local News

  • Identity thieves hit Midway coffers for $20K

    Midway City Manager Auburn Ford announced the City had been the victim of identity theft at the city council’s monthly meeting this past Thursday, losing more than $20,000 to scammers before the city’s bank caught wind of what was happening.
    Ford said the bank, Capital City, reimbursed Midway for the lost funds, but were now wanting the city to attain ACH blocking and filtering services. Council members unanimously approved the city attaining those services.

  • Budget workshops begin with nearly $575K in nonprofit funding requests

    Budget discussions for the county’s 2017 fiscal year began Thursday afternoon in the commission chambers.
    County Administrator Robert Presnell told the county commissioners who attended the meeting —  Brenda Holt and Anthony Viegbesie — the county may be a couple hundred thousand dollars short on funds needed for the proposed new agriculture center.

  • Leaders put brakes on Midway parties

    A Sunday evening party thrown weekly at a Midway park has been indefinitely canceled.
    Though the parties were well attended — or perhaps because of that fact — it had inspired the furor of many community members.
    The Midway Police Department posted a message on their Facebook page announcing the cancelation, writing “HANGOUT SUNDAYS in Midway are CANCELED. The event has outgrown the capacity of the City and its resources.”

  • Vehicle fire, explosion snarls traffic

    Rush-hour traffic from Tallahassee into Midway was stalled for nearly 40 minutes this past Thursday afternoon as firefighters extinguished the fire of a blazing PT Cruiser.
    According to the Midway Police Department, the car’s driver was headed to her Midway home when a parallel driver alerted her that her car had caught fire. MPD says the fire appears to have been caused by mechanical issues.
    The woman and her passengers were able to escape the car and find ground a good distance away from it before the car
    exploded.

  • West Gadsden High School grads urged to find their greatness

    West Gadsden High School graduates of the Class of 2016 celebrated the ending of their high-school careers in the school’s packed gym Friday evening surrounded by family and friends.
    In addition to thanking their parents and teachers for assisting them through their matriculation, valedictorian Allison Avelar and salutatorian Evelin Tomas encouraged their fellow graduates to continue striving for success and happiness, or as Tomas said, “keep on swimming.”

  • East Gadsden High School Class of 2016 graduates to surrounded by family, friends
  • GEMS reading scores among state’s highest

    Third-graders at Gadsden Elementary Magnet School and Stewart Street Elementary passed the state’s reading test at a rate far above the state’s 54 percent.
    However, the rest of the county’s third-graders came in below the state average.

  • A/C in the way OK in Quincy

    Quincy commissioners saved the Men of Action a $5,000 headache when they granted the nonprofit a license agreement authorizing the organization to keep their air conditioners situated on a piece of city property near the organization’s
    headquarters.
    Men of Action’s backing financial institution had notified the nonprofit that the equipment encroachment into city property created a risk that could require the city to ask the nonprofit to move the air conditioner any time.

  • Thronging to Quincyfest
  • Midway leaders mull party problems

    Although they didn’t make any decisions at their May meeting this past Thursday, Midway council members entertained the most recent city news and citizen opinion on a Sunday park party causing controversy in the city.
    City Manager Auburn Ford announced the city had been one of only five in the state to apply for housing applications through Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) and all the applicants had been selected. He said the city may receive up to $750,000 to help residents with housing problems and will begin finding residents for the program in June.