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Local News

  • Reflective surfaces

    Award-winning artist Dean Mitchell unveiled during an opening reception at the Gadsden Arts Center a collection of artworks he said draws parallels between the lives experienced by Native Americans in Phoenix and African-Americans in his hometown Quincy.
    The exhibition, entitled “Dean Mitchell’s American West: Poverty and the Human Spirit,” includes 43 artworks and will be on display at the Arts Center until April 2.

  • BOCC chooses local broadcaster

    County commissioners chose the company that will broadcast the commission’s twice-a-month meetings at their Tuesday night meeting. The matter was among several decided.
    The county will pay Southerland Enterprises of Quincy $1,300 a month to broadcast the meetings on Channel 13 in Quincy, Medicaom Channel 96 in Havana, Gretna and Greensboro, and Brighthouse cable Channel 2 in Chattahoochee, according to meeting filings. The meetings will also be streamed live on the Internet.
    Southerland Enterprises will provide the required equipment and a technician.

  • Day of service, safer homes

    Designating Martin Luther King Jr. Day a day of service ,as did many across the nation, groups of American Red Cross volunteers traveled door-to-door through a number of Quincy neighborhoods Monday offering households three free smoke alarms and installations, as well as magnet maps for drawing emergency escape routes.

  • Marking a milestone

    In one vote at their Tuesday meeting, Gadsden County’s  Board of County Commissioners approved for
    $61, 500 to be allocated between nine non-profit and senior citizen
    organizations.

  • Gretna continues to support slots at casino

    The City of Gretna filed a friend-of-the-court brief with the Florida Supreme Court last week detailing the city’s reasons for supporting the implementation of slot machines at Creek Entertainment.
    The city’s brief speaks of a “master plan” developed by the facility’s involved parties to build over the next 10 years a horse racetrack, at least one convention hotel and restaurants and shops on or near the facility, and implies that these attractions cannot be built without the implementation of slot machines.

  • Year in Review - City of Quincy

    Three city staffers holding interim leadership titles for more than a year were promoted to their title’s permanent position in 2015, as Mike Wade was made city manager in July, while in September Glenn Sapp was made police chief and Reggie Bell was made Public Works Director.
    In the City of Quincy’s only municipal election this past year, Mayor Derrick Elias retain his commission seat by narrowly beating Gadsden County Classroom Teachers’ Association President Ronte Harris in April.

  • Gadsden’s graduation rate sees surge

    The number of students who graduated within four years from the Gadsden County School District increased by nearly 10 percentage points in the 2014-2015 school year, but still fell 12 points behind the state average.
    65.4 percent of the district’s high-school seniors graduated during the 2014-2015 school year, according to a report released Tuesday by the Florida Department of Education.
    That rate is up from the county’s 2013-2014 rate of 56 percent, but still below the state rate of 77.8 percent. The state’s rate is up from last year by

  • 2015 in Review Law Enforcement

    The biggest crime and law enforcement stories of the year involve the convictions of the sheriff and a former deputy, the county’s biggest synthetic drug bust to date, an accused murderer’s escape from jail and a school official‘s alleged theft of more than $200,000.

  • BOCC planning for new leaders

    The Board of County Commissioners took advice at a Dec. 15 meeting from the president of the Florida Association of County Managers on how the county should handle the hiring of new county administration once current administration retires in the coming fall.

  • Midway to change charter

     Proposals to revise Midway’s city charter will be placed on the city’s special election ballot in April, the city’s council members decided earlier this month.
    Three changes to the charter are being proposed: 1) to downsize the number of council members from seven to five; 2) to change their compensation based on budget language and financial status of the city; 3) to alter the way the city votes on agenda items allowing for all votes voice votes as well as polling of council members individually.