Local News

  • Asking for help from Tallahassee

    As the county’s two state legislative representatives entertained public opinion from county residents and municipal representatives on what  the two should consider priority projects as they enter the upcoming legislative session, two recurring themes emerged: the need for funding to renovate the Livestock Pavilion in Quincy and support in bringing slot machines to Creek Entertainment in Gretna.
    Sen. Bill Montford and Rep. Alan Williams conducted the Gadsden County legislative delegation meeting Monday

  • Midway mulling red-light cameras

    Midway has a traffic problem.
    That’s the message a company hired to study traffic light violations delivered this past Thursday to the city council.
    After company representatives delivered their findings, the council unanimously voted to approve a contract for the company’s services.
    The contract is pending a city ordinance being passed at a later date.
    The company’s representatives told the council they set up cameras for 24 hours in Midway and recorded 230 violations, with only five of those offenders being “local.”

  • Court yanks slot machine approval at Gretna casino

    A Florida appeals court has reversed its ruling that would have allowed slot machines at the Creek Entertainment facility in Gretna.
    The 1st District Court of Appeals decided in May that because Gadsden County residents had voted to approve slot machines at the facility, Creek Entertainment was allowed to implement slots without legislative approval.

  • Sounding off on slots

    Some area residents shared their thoughts on slot machines in Gretna:
    * Catherine Butler, of Havana: “I would like to see it happen for the jobs because there are not many opportunities in Gadsden County for jobs. Everyone has to go to Tallahassee or Georgia.”
    * Thomasville, Ga., resident Billy Doyle had this to say:
    “I don’t play the slot machines but if part of the money is going to go back into the community and it’s not going to make the community suffer, I don’t see too much wrong with it.”

  • For a healthy future

    A Gretna church served as host Saturday for the 10th year for a daylong initiative to provide complimentary clothing, lunch and health screenings to local residents.
    The event, called “Gretna Health and Help Day,” was started when Jimmie Griffin saw a need for certain resources in Gretna. Being a retired nurse, she wanted to give the residents of her hometown access to health screenings they might not otherwise receive.
    At this year’s event, attendees were given access to free hypertension, diabetes, HIV and vision screenings, among others.

  • Shining through

    Cynthia Hayes-Riley believes cancer saved her life.
    She was diagnosed with breast cancer one year and one week after a car backed over her and then hit her again, seriously injuring her and killing her 15-year-old daughter, Crystal, who was trying to pull her mom out of the car’s path in East Gadsden High School’s parking lot after a football game. Her oldest daughter, Jocelyn, now 27, was not hurt.
    The aftermath of the tragedy in October 2006 left Hayes-Riley grief-stricken, depressed, unable to walk and
    asking why.

  • Downtown expert offers ideas

    In hopes of inspiring the current members of Quincy’s Main Street to rebuild downtown Quincy into a business district, the organization’s original leader spoke to the current members Friday
    She shared her experiences as Thomasville’s Main Street director during a 20-year period when the city’s downtown business district was rejuvenated.  

  • Sheriff to lace up walking shoes for breast cancer

    Sheriff Morris Young will host his third annual cross-county walk for breast cancer awareness October 30. The walk will begin in Chattahoochee and end in Midway this year.
    Though people are allowed to participate in the walk without a team and without paying a registration fee, the walk’s chairperson Ronterrious Green hopes they buy event t-shirts while hoping organizations like businesses, churches and sororities will pay the $35 it costs to register as a team. All funds go to efforts for breast cancer awareness and research, Green said.

  • Jury clears Quincy man in sex crime case

    A Quincy man prosecuted for sexual assault, burglary and theft has been found not guilty.
    A jury delivered the verdict rendering Gregory Marshall, 50, innocent Sept. 17 and he was released Tuesday morning.
    The trial lasted two days.
    Marshall had been accused of stealing his girlfriend’s purse and cellphone before assaulting her.
    The woman told deputies Marshall sexually assaulted her behind a house then choked her later that evening, and the deputies reported seeing bruises on the woman’s neck that corroborated her story.

  • Drug task force makes ‘molly’ bust

    The Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office made its biggest bust yet in its fight against synthethic drugs this past Friday when they arrested a suspect in Quincy’s Sawdust community.
    They report seizing more than 500 grams of the synthetic drug known as “molly” or “flakka,” in addition to
    4 pounds of marijuana, 32.7 grams of crack cocaine and nearly 10 grams of powder cocaine in connection with the arrest of Montavious Perkins. They also confiscated $616 that was located in the car Perkins was found in.