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Local News

  • Living black history

    Tallahassee Community College’s black history month program provided a stage for the founder of Quincy’s Black Heritage Museum to share the story of her civil rights work Friday morning on the college’s campus.

  • Quincy cleared to pay Brown's legal fees

    A request that would have temporarily disallowed the city of Quincy to use taxpayer funds to pay legal fees related to the recall effort against Commissioner Micah Brown has been denied. 

  • Havana apartment burns

    A fire completely destroyed an apartment at Havana Heights on Monday night, leaving a family displaced and their immediate neighbors temporarily unable to return to their own apartments.
    Though an incident report drafted by the Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office says the cause of the fire is undetermined, some of the apartment’s tenants and witnesses who saw the fire begin believe the cause was an in-wall air conditioning unit with frayed electrical circuits.

  • Corder gets 30-month sentence

    After making a tearful plea to the judge for no jail time, former captain of the GCSO Jim Corder was sentenced to 30 months in prison and one year of subsequent probation for  crimes committed in relation to stealing $1,785 from an
    arrestee.
    In addition, Corder will have to repay the victim in full for the stolen money.
    Corder will have to surrender himself to prison officials June 1. Instead of requiring Corder to immediately report to prison, the judge granted him an extension request so Corder could watch his daughter graduate from high school.

  • County to continue summer jobs for youth

    One hundred students between the ages of 14 and 18 will have the opportunity to earn a job with the county’s summer youth employment program this year. Gadsden County Commissioners decided to increase the number of students accepted into the program with a 4-1 vote at their April 7 meeting.

  • Goodwill to celebrate new digs Friday

    An everlasting topic of discussion in Gadsden County is the need for more opportunities to develop career skills for under- or un-employed job seekers. Goodwill Industries plans to contribute to that effort.

  • Learning to be brave
  • Living the dream: Newlyweds beginning cross-country trek

    Walking across the country like the titular character in “Forrest Gump”, a couple paused their 2,400-mile journey this past Thursday night to rest in Quincy.
    David and Natalie McDonald, 23 and 19, walk 20 miles every day, except Sundays, and plan to do so for the next seven months. After walking 20 miles every day, they either sleep outside in a tent or are invited by someone who knows the reason they’re walking to spend the night in their house.

  • Judge hears arguments in Quincy legal fee case

    The judge presiding over Quincy Commissioner Keith Dowdell’s lawsuit with a group of Quincy citizens against the city of Quincy made it clear in the case’s first hearing Tuesday afternoon he would be ruling over whether the Quincy Commission made an illegal decision paying legal expenses — not whether that decision was a
    logical one.

  • Quincy Shuttle service to resume March 2

    The Quincy Shuttle is being brought back after county commissioners voted to reinstate the service at their Feb. 3 meeting.

    The bus will run Monday through Friday beginning March 2.

    County Administrator Robert Presnell said the county decided to reinstate the Quincy Shuttle as a part of the goal to increase public transportation accessibility throughout the county.