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Local News

  • Fishing tourney takes over

    Gadsden County Tourist Development Council hosted the final leg of the Florida State Championship Crappie Masters’ Crappie Fishing Tournament this past weekend.  It was also the national qualifier.  The Renewable Fuels Association, American Ethanol and Bass Pro Shops hosted the event.
    Fifty-one teams from 12 states traveled to Lake Talquin for two days of competitive fishing.

  • Locals react to president’s ‘Muslim Ban’

    Millions are upset with President Donald Trump’s Executive Order temporarily halting travel from seven Muslim-majority countries.  
    The order, which was issued Friday, Jan. 27, severely restricted for 90 days citizens from Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya and Yemen from entering the U.S. on any visa category.  Additionally, for 120 days it also bars the entry of any refugee who is awaiting resettlement in the U.S., and prohibits all Syrian refugees entering the U.S. until further notice.
    The order has triggered protests nationwide.

  • TCC launches computer literacy class

    It’s easier than ever to get plugged into the digital age.
    The Tallahassee Community College Gadsden Center will off Computer and Internet Literacy (CGS 1060) as a course from Feb. 13 through May 5.  The class is offered on Mondays and Wednesday from 5:30 to 7:45 p.m.
    It’s a four-credit course, and those interested in enrolling in the course must already be a TCC student or apply to the school.

  • Third shooting suspect arrested

    A third suspect has been arrested in connection with a shooting in Gadsden Arms Apartments that left a 19-year-old Quincy man dead.
    Kentrell Thomas was shot on a sidewalk outside his apartment around 8 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 29.
    According to a statement from Quincy police, Kevonte Montre Thomas, 18, of Tallahassee, was arrested Feb. 1 in connection to the shooting.  Thomas is being held in the Gadsden County Jail with no bond, on charges of second-degree murder.

  • Quincy man dies in shooting

    A Sunday night shooting has left a Quincy man dead and his family grieving.  
    Shalaunda Nealy said she was in her upstairs apartment washing dishes with her daughter Key’Lasha Thomas when the sound of gunshots rang out at Gadsden Arms, an apartment complex.
    Key’Laysha said when she heard the first gunshot she dropped the dish and asked her mother if she heard it.
    “Lord, I hope that’s not my baby,” was Nealy’s response, both women said.
    Both women said they then heard five or six more shots.

  • Small community celebrates new traffic light

    The Concord traffic light in Havana is finally up and running.  It was originally slated to go up last fall, but was pushed back because of the holidays and weather conditions.
    County officials and citizens met at the corner of Fairbanks Ferry Road and Concord Road on Tuesday, Jan. 30, for an activation ceremony.
    Gadsden County Commission Chairwoman Sherrie Taylor welcomed everyone and followed up with a prayer.
    Citizens were also given an opportunity to speak at the ceremony.

  • State Rep. Alexander talks jobs at chamber event

    At this past Thursday’s Go Gadsden meeting, newly elected State Rep. Ramon Alexander gave an update on what he has been working on.
    Alexander said this year the Legislature is being asked to cut $3 million to $5 million from education — grades K through 12 and the state and university system.
    In an effort to cause chaos, Alexander said other members of the Legislature are trying to pit projects against
    each other.
    “Not in my back yard,” Alexander said.  “You can cut everybody else’s stuff, but not mine.”

  • GEMS students become published poets

    Sixteen Gadsden Elementary Magnet School students are now published authors.  
    Their poems were selected by Young Writers of America’s panel of educators to be published in a book titled “Award-Winning Young Writers of America.”
    The topics the students wrote on were “The World as I See It” and “What my Family Means to Me.”
    LaTasha Dilworth-Porter, the students’ English and language arts teacher, said this is her first year entering students in a poetry contest.  

  • Plans for school closings cause concerns

    Concerned citizens came out to the school board meeting Tuesday, Jan. 24, to voice their opinions on proposed of school consolidations.
    Barbara Brown said Gretna Elementary, one of the schools that’s proposed to be closed, is the rock of her community.  She said she was also worried about the overcrowding of classrooms and safety issues if the schools are combined.  Brown said there were many fights when Quincy and Havana students were combined to form East Gadsden High School.

  • County to keep same law firm

    After looking at other options, Gadsden County commissioners decided to retain their current legal counsel.
    In November the county issued a request for proposals for attorneys to represent them.  
    County Administrator Robert Presnell said three proposals were submitted in response to the RFP; however, one firm later withdrew its RFP from
    consideration.