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Today's Features

  • A community conversation will be held this evening at 6 p.m. at James A. Shanks Middle School regarding education in Gadsden County. Call 850-294-6694 for more information.

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    The Gadsden County bookmobile will be out of service Sept. 14-Oct. 1. The library will receive a new bookmobile through a grant in early September.

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    Main Street Quincy will host a night of music featuring Tallahassee Nights Live on the Courthouse Square Sept. 11 at 7:30 p.m. This is a free event.

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  • I was doing my early morning XM radio channel surfing when my ears caught a bouncy and light tune that also seem vaguely familiar.  I turned around to view the window on my radio which revealed I was listening to an Aaron Copland piece.  It was called "Duo for Flute and Piano."

  • • First Baptist Church in Quincy holds Sunday School each week at 9:45 a.m., followed by worship at 10:55. Sunday evening worship begins at 6 p.m. Sunday morning worship services are broadcast on Sunday events at 6 p.m. on 93.3 FM.

    • Church services at Mt. Pilgrim Primitive Baptist Church are held the first, second and fourth Sundays at 11 a.m., and at 8 a.m. on the third Sunday of each month. Church school begins at 9:45 a.m. each Sunday morning.

  • The Quincy Parks and Recreation Department Governance Committee will meet Sept. 3 at 6:30 p.m. at Quincy City Hall in the commission chambers.

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    Shiloh Community MB Church will host an education resource event Sept. 5 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Shiloh Community on Spooner Road.  The Gadsden County School District Mobile Resource Unit will be there, along with Superintendent Reginald James and officers from the Gadsden County Sheriff’s Office. There will also be free food and clothes.

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  • “Keep your politics and your political views to yourself” was a fundamental principle my father pounded solidly into my character. It’s one of the many principles that he successfully passed onto me.   Several of the rules he had set for his four children I chose not to pass on to my own son. I found that my father did not live by some of the rules and principles he had set for us.  Hypocrisy can be a difficult pill to swallow.

  • • First Baptist Church in Quincy holds Sunday School each week at 9:45 a.m., followed by worship at 10:55. Sunday evening worship begins at 6 p.m. Sunday morning worship services are broadcast on Sunday events at 6 p.m. on 93.3 FM.

    • Church services at Mt. Pilgrim Primitive Baptist Church are held the first, second and fourth Sundays at 11 a.m., and at 8 a.m. on the third Sunday of each month. Church school begins at 9:45 a.m. each Sunday morning.

  • A town hall meeting will be held with District 2 County Commissioner Doug Croley today at 6:30 p.m. at Tallavana Community Church in Havana. Citizens will have the opportunity to voice concerns to the commissioner and county staff, and be provided with an update on the progess of pertinent issues such as upcoming budget, property taxes and other matters of interest.

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  • The aim of the 1000 Man Rally is to get 1,000 or more men in Gadsden County to come together to learn how to empower themselves and help the community. The inaugural rally was held in Leon County last year and was the brain child of Rev. Greg James, senior pastor at Reclaiming the Land Ministries Inc.

  • Nine new recruits graduated last week from the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy at the Florida Public Safety Institute in Midway.

    Members of the Basic Recruit Class 347 were welcomed by Training Center Director James Murdaugh, who also introduced guest speaker, Ricky Lay.

    Lay, who is employed at the Wakulla Correctional Institute in the training division and has also served as a minister and a U.S. Marine, first thanked parents and friends of the graduates.

    “You have changed the direction of the future,” he told them.

  • Exotic glass balls had a way of escaping from large fishing nets that some Japanese fishermen used in the Pacific Ocean to keep their nets afloat. In time, these now-free objects would drift to the shores of isolated Wake Island, located about 2,300 miles west of Honolulu. They were of all sizes, greenish in color and usually opaque. I have seen them as small as 3 inches in diameter all the way up to over a foot.  Sometimes I’d find them washed up onto the shore still enclosed in a piece of netting.